Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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SLIPE, v.3, n.3 Also slype; sklype. [sləip]

I. v. 1. tr. To strip off, to peel (Gall. 1824 MacTaggart Gallov. Encycl. 428, slype; Rxb. 1825 Jam., ‡1923 Watson W.-B.); intr. to come off, like torn or dead skin, to slough off (Jam.). Also in Eng. dial. Bnff. 1866  Gregor D. Bnff. 162:
With aff, doon, doon our: he sklypet's stockin doon our's heel.
Uls. 1880  Patterson Gl.:
They would come and slype them [branches of trees] down in the night for no use.

2. (1) To draw (a thing) through the fingers or teeth, while squeezing slightly at the same time (Bwk., Rxb. a.1838 Jam. MSS. XI. 169); to squeeze a leech in this way to make it disgorge the blood (Rxb. 1825 Jam., ‡1923 Watson W.-B.).

(2) in reference to a method of smearing sheep: presumably to strip back the locks of wool with the fingers in order to apply the salve. s.Sc. 1844  Sc. Farmer (Sept.) 73:
Many shepherds are very unskilful in the operation of smearing, which, unless it is well performed, cannot be expected to produce its desired ends. Those who are in the habit of what is called slyping, in the south of Scotland, are not competent persons for applying the oil and tallow salve, unless they are also acquainted with the method called rolling.

II. n. A flap of skin or the like (Rxb. 1825 Jam., slype).

[Mid.Eng. slype, to peel, skin. Prob. orig. the same word as Slipe, v.2 Cf. L.Ger. slipen, Du. slijpen, to whet, sharpen, polish, from the basic sense of “to draw sideways, in a slanting direction to pass something over a smooth surface”, as in sharpening an edged instrument. Cf. Slipe, v.1, Slip, n.1 and Slip, n.2 above.]

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"Slipe v.3, n.3". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 11 Dec 2018 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/slipe_v3_n3>

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