Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

Hide Quotations Hide Etymology Cite this entry

SCRATCH, n., v. Sc. usages:

I. n. 1. Mashed potatoes, made thin and boiled with suet, and mixed with oatmeal. Ags. 1857  A. Douglas Hist. Ferryden 86:
A body cud eat o' them [potatoes] till they misportioned themsels; an' sae fine scratch the left anes mak'.

2. A colloq. name for the devil. Now only dial. in Eng., and also in form Old Scrat. Rnf. 1852  J. Mitchell Grey Goose Quill 139:
Gane are the days o' gude John Knox, Wha used sae well Auld Scratch to box.

3. In dim. form scratchie, a disease of sheep (Rxb. 1923 Watson W.-B.; Lth. 1969). Cf. scrapie s.v. Scrape.

II. v. As in Eng. Agent n. scratcher, 1. a toy consisting of a string, a pin and a button so contrived as to swing and tap against a window-pane on a dark night to annoy the occupants of the house (Mry. 1925); 2. a trawler that fishes as close as possible to the three-mile limit and is thus able to come to port more freq. with the catches (ne.Sc. 1969); 3. a bed (Gsw. 1934 Partridge Slang Dict.), appar. orig. a public lodging-house term, sc. as being verminous. Gen.Sc. slang. Cf. Eng. slang flea-bag. 2. Abd. 1949  Banffshire Jnl. (23 Aug.):
Aberdeen trawlers are classified as “Long trippers” and “Scratchers”. The former work off Iceland, the Faroes, the Orkneys and Shetland, or off the North-West coast. The latter fish off the East Coast. They land their catches several times a week.
3. Dmf. 1910  R. Quin Borderland (1933) 36:
No rest for you here — take my tip — Until you've squared yer scratcher.
wm.Sc. 1958  Bulletin (29 Nov.):
Come on, ye wee deevils. Awa' to your scratchers at the toot.

You may wish to vary the format shown below depending on the citation style used.

"Scratch n., v.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 14 Dec 2017 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/scratch>

20547

snd

Try an Advanced Search

Browse SND:

Browse Up
    Loading...
Browse Down

Share: