Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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SAW, n.1 Also sa(a), sau. Gen.Sc. forms of Eng. salve, unguent, ointment (Sc. 1825 Jam.; Rxb. 1942 Zai). See P.L.D. §§ 70. 3., 78. 1. Freq. in proverbial phrs. as in quots. below. [sɑ:, s:] Sc. 1745  R. Chambers Hist. Rebellion (1869) 137:
A quantity of chocolate, found in General Cope's carriage, was afterwards sold publicly in the streets of Perth, under the denomination of Johnnie Cope's Saw — that is, salve.
Bnff. c.1810  W. Cramond Old Cullen (1882) 38:
“Cerat'sa'” to heal wounds was supplied in a mussel shell.
Sc. 1823  Scots Mag. (May) 588:
I'll anoint every bruise wi' Marion's bourtree sa'.
Sc. 1832  A. Henderson Proverbs 89:
Seek your sa' whare you got your sair.
Ags. 1853  W. Blair Aberbrothock 70:
She had a rinnin' in her head, an' wanted a twa three bawbees to get saw.
Ayr. 1876  J. Ramsay Gleanings 18:
Come, a wee drap mair, And let the saw just seek the sair.
Wgt. 1877  “Saxon” Gall. Gossip 30:
“O! Salve — saw”, says the Doctor. “You know what saw is”.
Fif. 1912  D. Rorie Mining Folk 407, 413:
“Let the sau sink to the sair”, was said jestingly as a reason for drinking whisky instead of rubbing it in as an outward application. . . . Dinna hae the sau waitin' on the sair (i.e. do not anticipate trouble).
Rnf. 1920  J. Donald Greenock Charact. 76:
Go you to Figgins in Greenock and you'll get a “sa-a” for to cure that.
Sh. 1949  J. Gray Lowrie 93:
A peerie box o' growin saa.
Mry. 1956  Northern Scot (7 April):
See! here's a clean clootie, Ah've spread it wi' saw, Tae haud it fae bailin' an' keep dirt awa.

[O.Sc. saw, salve, 1490.]

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"Saw n.1". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 18 Dec 2017 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/saw_n1>

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