Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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OCHT, n., pron., adj., adv. Also oucht (Sh. 1892 J. Burgess Rasmie's Büddie 43, Ork. 1904 Dennison Orcad. Sk. 3), och (Gall. 1884 D. M'Whirter Ploughboy's Musings 63); owt (Sc. 1926 H. M'Diarmid Penny Wheep 31; s.Sc. 1964). Sc. forms of Eng. aught, ought. [oxt; Ork., s.Sc. + ʌut]

I. n. 1. As in Eng., anything (Per., Ayr. 1915–23 Wilson; Uls. 1953 Traynor). Gen.Sc. Also in the form ochts (Rxb. 1923 Watson W.-B.), and sometimes with neg. force = Nocht, nothing, as in 1962 quot. Cld. 1818  Scots Mag. (Aug.) 156:
I am vext I canna gie ye a drink of ocht but water, my bonnie bairn.
Abd. 1871  W. Alexander Johnny Gibb xxxvi.:
There's nae occasion for you to say ocht or flee.
Lnk. 1880  Clydesdale Readings 66:
She made the bairds crake, an' the steeples jump like oucht.
Wgt. 1880  G. Fraser Lowland Lore 158:
There's never ocht in his pouch binna when his han's int.
e.Lth. 1892  J. Lumsden Sheep-Head 239:
They didna ocht but lauch — in fun was a' their faith!
Dmf. 1915  D. J. Beattie Oor Gate-en' 41:
We clam' the wa' an' got doon to fin' if there was owt in the holes.
Rxb. 1925  E. C. Smith Mang Howes 10:
Neext A speerd if A cood geet ochts ti eat.
Cai. 1932  John o' Groat Jnl. (25 Nov.):
Ye're a gentleman an' winna say ocht about it.
Ork. 1956  C. M. Costie Benjie's Bodle 10:
The hale family wir geud honest folk, wha . . . never seekid owt fae ony body.
s.Sc. 1962  Southern Annual 28:
Some grand cleckings of Deuks, Yirls, Loords, and nae end o' nabbery that were fit for ocht else.

Phrs.: (1) deil a o(u)cht, see Deil, n., II. 1. (8); (2) (nedder) aucht nor ocht, ought nor what, neither one thing nor another, nothing whatever. See Aucht; (3) no a(e) oucht, not a single thing (Sh. 1964); (4) ocht ta hell, id. (Id.); (5) ower ocht, adj., adv., beyond measure, immoderate(ly), extraordinar(il)y. (2) Kcd. 1819  J. Burness Plays 309:
These twa days he's done ought-nor-what.
Abd. 1871  W. Alexander Johnny Gibb vi.:
Johnny kent nedder aucht nor ocht aboot it.
(3) Sh. 1899  J. Spence Folk-Lore 249:
No ae oucht haed we bit twartree gaupins o' kleepie stanes.
(5) Uls. 1879  W. G. Lyttle Readings 27:
He lauched ower ocht.

2. A person of some standing and importance, a “somebody”. Dmf. 1863  R. Quinn Heather Lintie 58:
Jock Aitken, Lowrie, and Jim Paton, Are ochts amang them.

II. pron. Ocht o' the twa, either of the two. Rare. Abd. 1921  Swatches o' Hamespun 26:
Eppie didna care a docken-blade for ocht o the twa o' them.

III. adj. Any. Comb. oucht kind, any kind of. Rnf. 1807  R. Tannahill Poems (1876) 182:
Nor past he ocht thing slichtly by.
e.Lth. 1885  S. Mucklebackit Rural Rhymes 35, 57:
Against the rains, an' ocht mishap . . . O' oucht kind grain.
Lnk. 1890  H. Muir Rutherglen 35, 53:
Nae mair guilty than ocht man we'll meet . . . To tell ocht haet else they were asket to say.

IV. adv. Somewhat, rather, in some way or degree. Ayr. 1790  J. Fisher Poems 60:
An' when fouk cam' That fuddle wad I thought ought lang.
Lth. 1852  M. Oliphant Adam Graeme 219:
Are ye doing ought weel, Robbie?
Lnl. 1890  A. M. Bisset Spring Blossoms 71:
Gin I keep her ocht ower lang.
Sc. 1928  J. G. Horne Lan'wart Loon 12:
Tam was mair nor ocht camsteerie.

Ocht n., pron., adj., adv.

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"Ocht n., pron., adj., adv.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 18 Dec 2017 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/ocht_n_pron_adj_adv>

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