Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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MUGGIE, n. Also muggy; mog(g)i(e).

1. The stomach of an animal or fish (Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928); Ork. 1929 Marw.; Sh. 1963), specif. that of a cod-fish which is filled with chopped cod-liver and boiled to form a popular dish krappin-, (s.v. Crappen), Krappit-, liver(ed)-muggies s.v. Liver, also of a pig used to make smoked pork sausages (Sh. 1963). Comb. eel muggie, a fish stomach used as a container for eel fat (Sh. 1897 Shetland News (13 Nov.)). Sh. 1822  S. Hibbert Descr. Sh. 553:
Another favourite Shetland dainty is known by the name of “Cropping Moggies,” consisting of the liver of the cod mixed with flour and spice, and boiled in the fish's stomach. . . . In the plainer form of “livered moggies” the flour and spice are absent.
Sh. 1877  G. Stewart Fireside Tales 27:
He never wis düne eatin liver muggies till . . . he turned as fat as a tiestie.
Sh. 1899  J. Spence Folk-Lore 179:
An' beautiful muggies, spleetin' wi gree, Da bite o' your teeth sent a spoot i' your e'e.
Sh. 1932  J. Saxby Trad. Lore 171:
The muggie (stomach) of some fish was cleaned out and filled with the liver and oatmeal well mixed with pepper and salt. This was called “krappit muggies.”

2. Rennet, made from the stomach of a calf (Sh. 1963).

3. The contents of a limpet shell (Sh. 1963). Sh. 1956  U. Venables Life in Sh. vii.:
You draw the fish in by putting a bit of salt herring in your poke or spitting chewed limpet muggies on the water. . . . A poke is a man's tool; it is roughly five feet across and a single scoop can catch about half a hundred weight.

[Norw. mage, O.N. magi, the stomach.]

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"Muggie n.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 16 Dec 2017 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/muggie>

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