Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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MINNON, n. Also min-, men(n)-; -in, -en, -an; -e(n)t; reduced dim. forms minnie (Bwk. a.1862 Whistle Binkie (1890) II. 248), ¶minnock (Lnk. 1859 J. Parker Poems 33); mintie (Rxb. a.1838 Jam. MSS. X. 201). The minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus (Per., Fif., Lth., Ayr. 1915–26 Wilson). Gen.(exc.I.)Sc.; also applied more gen. to any similar small freshwater fish; an angler's artificial minnow. Freq. used attrib. Deriv. mennen-hood. For baggie-mennen, see Baggie, n.3, 2. [′mɪnən, ′mɛnən(t)] Sc. 1725  Ramsay Gentle Shep. iii. iii.:
The Saugh-trees shades the Menin-pool.
Abd. 1775  Aberdeen Jnl. (10 April):
Also artificial Minnin, single and double Box Swivels.
Rnf. 1807  R. Tannahill Poems (1900) 138:
He kent a creatures, clute an tail, . . . Up frae the mennon to the whale.
Kcb. 1815  J. Gerrond Poems 114:
Minnons, pars, and eels he stabbit Nieved aneth brow and stane.
Rxb. 1817  J. Barrie Poems 66:
Where trouts and menents sport and loup.
Sc. 1827  R. Chambers Picture Scot. I. 175:
The rogue will remember having been nearly hooked last year in the days of his mennen-hood, and may therefore look before he leaps.
Bwk. 1897  R. Calder Poems 63:
We sought the heather-lintie's nest Or gump'd for mennents in the pool.
Fif. 1946  J. C. Forgan Maistly 'Muchty 10:
I'd gang doon by the Plains an' for goldies I'd fish, In yon deep minnen ditch I weel ken.

[O.Sc. menoun, id., 1375, which N.E.D. suggests may be an Anglo-French form of O.E. myne, some kind of small fish.]

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"Minnon n.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 20 Sep 2018 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/minnon>

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