Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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AYONT, Ayon, Ayond, Ayownt, prep. and adv. [ə′jɔnt I.Sc., n.Sc., but Abd. + ə′jɔn; ə′jont m.Sc. + ə′jɔnt; ə′jɔnd Slk.; ə′junt s.Sc.]

A. prep.

1. Place. (1) On the further side of. Sc. 1818  Scott Rob Roy xxiii.:
For three sufficient reasons, Bailie Jarvie. — First, for auld langsyne; — second, for the sake of the auld wife ayont the fire at Stuckavrallachan, that made some mixture of our bluids.
Sc. 1887  R. L. Stevenson Underwoods 87:
A mile an' a bittock, a mile or twa Abüne the burn, ayont the law.
Ags. 1924  M. Angus The Tinker's Road 9:
Ower the bent, an' ower the bent Ayont the blawing sand.
Edb. 1798  D. Crawford Poems 53:
An' that has made the fairies flit Ayont the sea.
Wgt. 1907  Jeanie Donnan Hameland 12:
Ayont the heavin' ocean, 'mid scenes an' places braw.
Rxb.(D) 1925  E. C. Smith Mang Howes an Knowes 10:
The heat wasna cannie as A cam ti the main road, ayownt. the Yill, again.

(2) Used with lie, esp. of a wife = to be the bedfellow of. Ags. 1820  A. Balfour Contemplation with other Poems 263:
A lad like him! who could affront him? In twa three ouks she lay ayont him.

2. Time. Past, later than. m.Sc. 1927  J. Buchan Witch Wood xii.:
A faither is a faither though he live ayont the threescore and ten years whilk is our allotted span.
Ayr. 1787  Burns Death and Dr Hornbook xxxi.:
The auld kirk-hammer strak the bell Some wee short hour ayont the twal.
Kcb. 1912  A. Anderson Surfaceman's Later Poems 271:
She's just awee ayont sixteen.

3. fig. Beyond any limit, better than. Sc. 1750  Scots Mag. 113:
Simplex munditiis, as auld Horace says; It's far ayont my pith to sound her praise.
Sc. 1851  G. Outram Lyrics (1874) 77:
He snuffs, an' he smokes, an' he drinks, an' he chaws, Till he's donnard, an' daised, an' ayont ony use.
Bch. 1929  J. Milne Dreams o' Buchan 22:
Something ayon' the ken o' man, Fate, luck, or chance, whate'er ye will.
Ags. 1776  C. Keith Farmer's Ha' 13:
Wi' birr he bangs his paper out, And thinks his point ayont a doubt.
m.Lth. 1882  A. Cargill in Mod. Sc. Poets ed. Edwards IV. 55:
His dochter Jean's ayont it a', Guid faith! she is a dainty ladye.
Ayr. 1824  A. Crawford Tales of my Grandmother 185:
Did he ever gie you a present o' ony thing ayont the value o' twa yard o' ha'penny tape?
Wgt. 1804  R. Couper Poems I. 60:
Strong giant life, ayont thy ken, Is stalking at thy side.
Rxb. 1847  H. S. Riddell Poems 22:
In troth ye wad hae thought she had A something in her made her glad Ayont the course o' nature. Quasi-noun.
Slk. a.1835  Hogg Tales, etc. (1837) III. 226:
Ye're gaun to do the thing that ye'll repent only aince — for a' the time that ye hae to exist baith in this world and the neist, and that's a lang lang forrit and ayond.

B. adv. Beyond, lit. and fig. Sc. 1912  A.O.W.B. Fables frae the French 20:
Juist gang yer wa's ayont, an' fin' anither Wee gressy hillock for yersel, my brither!
Sc. 1922  P. Macgillivray Bog Myrtle and Peat Reek 27:
Whar Urie wynds to meet the Don, And Bennachie towers up ayon, There poet Thom her pity won.
Sc. 1923  R. A. Taylor The End of Fiammetta 207:
And I rarely loe the burn that rowes Ayont wi' its warlock clavers.
Sc. 1927  T. McWilliam Around the Fireside 29:
Ayont, a bonnie Vale I see Wi' hills enfoldin' roon.
Abd. 1768  A. Ross Helenore 42:
A burn ran i' the laigh, ayont there lay As mony feeding o' the tither brae.
Abd. 1873  P. Buchan The Guidman o' Inglismill 32:
A-h! but there's nane ayont to say “Here's tee you.”

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"Ayont prep., adv.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 15 Dec 2017 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/ayont>

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