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From the Scottish National Dictionary
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  1. A v.A, v.inf. = have, q.v.  
  2. Hunk n.1†HUNK, n.1 A lazy slut. Cf. Hulk, n.1, v. Rxb. 1825 Jam.: A sluttish, indolent woman, a drab; as, “a nasty hunk,” “a lazy hunk.” [Prob. a fig. use of hunk, a lump, a thick clumsy piece.]  
  3. Kelly-clod n. comb.¶KELLY-CLOD, n.comb. A pick-a-back (m.Lth. 1936).  
  4. Kitchal n.KITCHAL, n. A pot-belly, “a corporation”, a person with a stout paunch (Ork. 1960). [′kɪtʃəl] Ork. 1929 Marw.: He had a muckle kitchal. He was a great kitchal o' a man. [Etym. uncertain. Phs. a deriv 
  5. Sauties interj.‡SAUTIES, int. A cry for a truce in a game, a Barley, pax! (Abd. 1967). [Lat. satis, enough.]  
  6. Yowt n.2YOWT, n.2 A blow, a thump, a dull thud (ne.Sc. 1974). Also used adv. with a thud (Id.). [Imit.]  
  7. Nickle n.2NICKLE, n.2 A fight, as ofdogs; a squabble, a heated argument (Sh. 1964).  
  8. Wampler n.¶WAMPLER, n. “A rake, a wencher” (Sc. 1911 S.D.D.). [Poss. a mistake for rampler, see Rample.]  
  9. Dimple n.2DIMPLE, n.2 “A chain to fasten a cow in a stall” (Mry.1 1925).  
  10. supplementary (1976) to Blitter n.1BLITTER, n.1 Add: 2. A sea-taboo word for a sheep, a “bleater” (Sh. 1958).  
  11. Maraline n.MARALINE, n. A nonsense word in a children's rhyme. Ags. 1906 Rymour Club Misc. I. 47: Call-a-cob, maraline, Cast a barrel in a string.  
  12. Gubble n.GUBBLE, n. A stupid person, a “clod” (Kcb.4 1900). [A dim. form of Gob, n.2, a lump; cf. Eng. dial. gob, a foolish, lumpish person.]  
  13. Wait n.2WAIT, n.2 Also wate. A mill-race, the watercourse from a mill (Cai. 1905 E.D.D., Cai. 1973). [Norw. dial. veit(a), O.N. veit(a), a ditch.]  
  14. Trace n.2¶TRACE, n.2 A trice, a short sudden movement (Sc. 1911 S.D.D.). [Prob. a confusion of trice with trace, a vestige, a small amount.]  
  15. Rander n.3¶RANDER, n.3 A corruption of Brander. Abd. c.1881 W. Watt Tinker's Rhyme: Wull ye no' buy a rander, a tander, A roaster, a toaster?  
  16. supplementary (1976) to Gab n.1, v.GAB, n.1, v. I. 2. Add: (5) A fork in a tree, or between a branch and a shoot (Rnf. a.1850 Crawfurd 
  17. supplementary (1976) to Beich n.¶BEICH, n. “A lown sunny place among hills, a sheltered sunny spot of a hill” (Rnf. a.1850 Crawfurd MSS. (N.L.S.) B. 231, ‘a Kilmacolm word’). [Orig. obscure.]  
  18. Flisom n.FLISOM, n. A flake, a particle; a very small amount (Abd. 1900). Also in e.An. dial. [′flɪzəm] Abd.27 1952: A flisom o snaa; a flisom o a shower. [A deriv. of Fliss.]  
  19. Hulbie n.†HULBIE, n. A large unwieldy object, a clumsy person. Lnk. 1825 Jam.: A hulbie of a stane, a large unwieldy stone; a hulbie of a house, man, etc. [Orig. obscure. Prob. unconnected with the preceding.]  
  20. Kebrock n.KEBROCK, n. Anvthing big and clumsy. Rxb. a.1838 Jam. MSS. X. 165: A kebrock o' a stane, — o' a bairn. [Prob. a dim. form of Caber, 1., a heavy pole, 7., a big, clumsy man.]  
  21. Rivvle n.2RIVVLE, n.2 A stout, thick-set person, a gnarled or nobbly object. Hence deriv. rivvely, rivvaly, thick-set, stout. Ork. 1929 Marw.: A rivvle o' a staff, a rivvle o' a boy . . . a muckle rivvely chiel 
  22. supplementary (1976) to Maggiedoozler n.MAGGIEDOOZLER, n. A paragon, a superb specimen of its kind, a real “stunner”. Dmf. 1919 Border Mag. (Dec.) 189: He's a gran' 'un, a fair clipper, a perfect maggiedoozler [of a horse]. [From Maggie, pers 
  23. Knolt n.KNOLT, n. Also hnolt (Angus). A log of wood, a lump, “a thick, lumpish thing” (Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928), 1914 Angus Gl.); fig. a big, well-developed person or animal (Ib., Sh. 1960). [knolt, hnolt] Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928): A knolt o' a codlin. A hnolt o' a chap. [Of Scand. orig. Cf. Norw. knolte, a knoll, Sw. dial. knollt, a lump of earth.]  
  24. Arro n.ARRO, n. [′ɑro, ′aro] Ork. 1929 Marw.: A young hen commencing to lay. [Cf. Gael. eireag, a young hen, and Norse aaring, aarung, a year-old animal; Sc. earock, a bird a year old; Sh. erik, a yearling.]  
  25. Caibe n.CAIBE, n. A cabinet-maker. [keb] Ags.17 1938: A local joiner said to me the other day: “That's a job for a caibe, no' for a joiner.” [Prob. a contr. for cabinet(-maker).]  
  26. Corrieshear n.CORRIESHEAR, n. “A lurch, a stagger, a sudden swerve from a straight course; sometimes used for a fall” (Arg.1 1937, obsol. or obs.). [Prob. from Coorie, corrie, to bend, + Sheer, a lurch, swerve, q.v.]  
  27. Crony n.†CRONY, CRONIE, n. A potato. Dmf. 1801 A. Clark Poems 36: . . . they wad join a meal wi' me An' pick a cronie. Hence crony-hill, a potato-field (Dmf. 1808 Jam.). [Jam. says: “it seems to be a cant 
  28. Chick-a-diddle n.†CHICK-A-DIDDLE, n. A child's name for a chicken. Cf. Eng. chickabiddy. Sc. 1826 Scott Journal (1890) I. (3 Oct.) 265: Draw a chalk line on a table, and lay chick-a-diddle down with his bill on it.  
  29. Cluster n.CLUSTER, n. “A half-made article; a shapeless thing” (Ant. 1905 E.D.D. Suppl.). [Cf. obs. Eng. cluster, a rounded mass or conglomeration, a “clutter,” and clusterfist, a clumsy-fisted fellow, a lout 
  30. Bjartin n.BJARTIN, n. “A little fellow (child)” (Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928)); “a youth, a boy, a young lad” (Sh. 1914 Angus Gl.). [′bjɑrtɪn] [O.N. birtingr, a trout (Zoëga). Cf. Sc. “my wee trootie” addressed to a 
  31. Karriewhitchit n.KARRIEWHITCHIT, n. A term of endearment for a child or young animal (Ags. 1808 Jam.; Abd.30 1959, of a cat). [kəre′ʍtʃət] Abd.31 1950: Of a kitten — “Sic a dear little karriewhitchit o' a crater.”  
  32. Kate n.†KATE, n. A hole in a sack or bag (Rxb. a.1838 Jam. MSS. XI. 94). [Prob. a fronted vowel form with derived meaning of Cat, n.3, a handful of straw, sc. a hole stuffed with straw.]  
  33. Peep n.3‡PEEP, n.3 A kind of small marble (e.Lth. 1965). Hdg. 1886 J. P. Reid Facts & Fancies 193: I've gat fowre bools, a peep an' a', A glassie an' a jairie. [Phs. a variant of Eng. pip. Cf. Paip.]  
  34. Tie n.2†TIE, n.2 A small strip of land, prob. a part of a run-rig system (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [Norw. dial. teig, a rood, a piece of hay meadow, O.N. teigr. a strip of arable or meadowland.]  
  35. Roog n.2ROOG, n.2 A spawned fish; a poor fish in a catch (Fif. 1968). Adj. roogie. [rug] Fif. 1952: A roog, or a roogie fish — a spawned fish. [Poss. an extended use of roog, obs. form of rogue. See Roogle.]  
  36. Susket n.¶SUSKET, n. A shot, a ball from a gun. Per. a.1869 C. Spence Poems (1898) 183: And her sae sickened wi' a susket Sent frae the muzzle o' a musket. [Nonce word formed to rhyme with musket.]  
  37. Yaager n.YAAGER, n. A horse; also transf. a strong man (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [′jɑ:gər] [Etym. uncertain, ? a deriv. form from Norw. åk, ok, O.N. ok, a yoke, or phs. simply a corruption of yoker, sc. a yoke-horse.]  
  38. supplementary (2005) to Mollacher n.MOLLACHER, n. also mollicker. Something impressively big.Arg. 1991: It's a mollacher. [of a cabbage]Arg. 1992: It's a mollicker o a sheep.Edb. 2003: She's a big mollacher o a wumman.  
  39. supplementary (1976) to Jute n.JUTE, n. I. 3. Add: Phr. a Geordie Jute day, a hot day, sc. a good day for a drink, quasi from Geordie Jute, as a nickname for a tippler.  
  40. supplementary (1976) to Beakie n.BEAKIE, n. A slang word for a policeman. Sc. 1849 A. Bell Melodies 87: Reivers and rogues by the Beakies a-chasin' out. [Cf. slang Eng. beak, a magistrate, and beaksman, a constable.]  
  41. Clap-tae n. comb.CLAP-TAE, n. comb. A small erection built against a larger one, a lean-to (Kcb.9 1937).  
  42. Massie n.MASSIE, n. A large wooden hammer, a mallet (Mry. 1910). [A variant, prob. dim., form of Mash, Fr 
  43. Kjimsie n.†KJIMSIE, n. A fellow (Sh. 1866 Edm. Gl.). [Cf. Norw. dial. kymsa, kymse, a poor wretch, a bungler.]  
  44. Knae v.KNAE, v. With on: to fix a hook to a fishing-line by a hitch (Sh. 1958). [kne:] [Orig. obscure.]  
  45. Knight n.†KNIGHT, n. A jocular name for a close stool (Sc. 1808 Jam.). See Sir John. [A pun on night (-stool).]  
  46. Bawbrie n.†BAWBRIE, n. (See quot.) Rxb. 1825 Jam.2: Bawbrie. A broil, a great noise; a gipsy term.  
  47. Nulsh n.†NULSH, n. A person or thing of some considerable size. Ayr.4 1928: A nulsh o' a bodie. [Orig 
  48. Bawsworth n.BAWSWORTH, n. A halfpenny-worth. Fif. 1914 A. Birrel in T.S.D.C. I. 18: A bawsworth o' toffee. [For 
  49. Oorkan n.OORKAN, n. A bunion (Cai. 1964). Gael. [′urkən] [Gael. adharcan, lit. “a little horn,” i.e. a 
  50. Govit ppl. adj.†GOVIT, ppl.adj. Hollowed out (Cld. 1825 Jam.). [? A variant form from Cove, n., a cavern, a recess.]  
  51. Jolster n.¶JOLSTER, n. A mixture, a hotch-potch, “a quantity of ill-prepared victuals” (Slk. 1825 Jam.). Cf 
  52. Potch interj.POTCH, POTCH, int. A call to a pig (Inv. 1957). [Gael. poitidh, poitidh, id., phs. ad. poit, a pot.]  
  53. Theef n.†THEEF, n. Also thief. A breaking of wind, a bad smell (Cai. 1905 E.D.D.). Cf. Feff. [O.N. þefr, a 
  54. Thoog a poog n.¶THOOG A POOG, n. A lie, a hoax, a leg-pull. Prob. a nonce idiosyncrasy. Peb. 1899 J. Grossart Chronicles 50: “A ghost!” derisively snorted the Cooper, “ga' wa' mon, ga' wa', that's jist a thoog a poog, and ye've gane and spoilt a guid nicht's fishin'. But it wis rale shabby o' the scoondril tae fricht ye, Charlie, and sae mony braw fish in the water — that alane proved it a thoog a poog, and no a 
  55. Bind poke n.†BIND POKE, n. A niggard. Sc. 1721 J. Kelly Proverbs 219: The Scots call a niggardly Man, a bind 
  56. Tullyat n.¶TULLYAT, n. A contemptuous term for a bundle (Sc. 1825 Jam.). [Appar. a corruption of dulget 
  57. Sacrach n.¶SACRACH, n. A small quantity. Ags. 1921 T.S.D.C. IV.: Jist a sacrach on a groser bush. [Orig 
  58. Puilo n.PUILO, n. A dissolute, disreputable woman, a worthless female (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [? Norw. dial. pøle, a vagrant, vagabond.]  
  59. Reepan n.†REEPAN, n A despicable creature, a tell-tale (Gall. 1824 MacTaggart Gallov. Encycl. 406). [Poss. ad. Ir. ripín, a chatterer.]  
  60. Reevo n.REEVO, n. A rig or ridge in a cultivated field (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [Norw. rive, a strip of forest.]  
  61. Stappal n.STAPPAL, n. A stout, stocky, dumpy person. Ork. 1929 Marw.: A stappal of a boy. [Norw. dial 
  62. Bevie n.BEVIE, n. “A jog, a push” (Sc. 1808 Jam.). [Perhaps a reduced form of Bevel, n. (2).]  
  63. Tae n.4¶TAE, n.4 A cantankerous person, he's a tae o' a crater (Cai. 1921 T.S.D.C.). [Phs. erron. for Taid 
  64. Benzel n.BENZEL, n. “A heap” (Sc. 1911 S.D.D.). [Prob. a variant of Banyel, z being a mistaken spelling for 
  65. Slod n.SLOD, n. A clumsy graceless man, a hobbledehoy, a lumbering, awkward fellow (Abd. 1949). [Orig 
  66. Yirpo n.YIRPO, n. A big, lumpy girl (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [jɪrp] [Norw. yrpe, a stout, thick object, esp. of a 
  67. Epie n.†EPIE, Yepie, n. “A blow; as, with a sword” (Rxb. 1825 Jam.2). [? From Fr. épée, a sword.]  
  68. supplementary (1976) to Callises n. pl.CALLISES, n.pl. A footpath for cattle through a meadow (Rxb. a 1838 Jam. MSS. X. 35). [Orig 
  69. supplementary (1976) to Chaif n.CHAIF, n. Delete this as a form of St.Eng. chiv, id., a plane used by a cooper.  
  70. supplementary (1976) to Gneut n.GNEUT, n. Etym. note. Add: But cf. Du. †knoet, id, a dunderhead, a nickname for a Low German.  
  71. supplementary (1976) to Haltershank n. comb.HALTERSHANK, n.comb. A guide-rope attached to a horse's headstall (Rxb. a.1838 Jam. MSS. XI. 184 
  72. supplementary (1976) to Birse n.2BIRSE, n.2 Add: (3) in dim. form birzie, a lump of faeces, a turd (Ags. 1961), a child's word.  
  73. Gack n.†GACK, n. “A gap; as, ‘a gack in a hedge'” (Fif. 1825 Jam.). [A corrupt form of Glack (see 1. and 2.).]  
  74. Flagrum n.†FLAGRUM, n. A blow, a thump (Abd. 1825 Jam.). [Cf. Flag, v.4 or phs. a schoolboy usage from Lat. flagrum, a whip.]  
  75. Fleer n.FLEER, n. A jollification, a spree, a “high old time.” [′fliər] Slk. 1950: He's had a richt fleer 
  76. Cuddie n.3CUDDIE, n.3 †1. “A gutter in a street” (Rxb. 1825 Jam.2; 1923 Watson W.-B., obs.). 2. “A ditch or cutting to lead the drainage of a district to a river; also, an overflow connection between a canal and a river” (Sc. 1887 Jam.6). [Prob. a later variant of Cundy, a covered drain, q.v., with assimilation of n 
  77. Cungle n.2CUNGLE, n.2 A disturbance, a shindy. Cf. Cangle. [kʌŋl] Ayr. a.1878 H. Ainslie Pilgrimage, etc., and Poems (1892) 306: His kimmer may kick up a cungle.  
  78. Braal n.†BRAAL, n. A fragment. Ags. 1808 Jam.: “There's nae a braal to the fore,” There is not a fragment remaining. [Cf. Browl, a little piece of anything.]  
  79. Brankie n.BRANKIE, n. “A wooden board for turning cakes on a girdle” (Mry.1 1925); “a spatulated iron utensil for turning cakes on a girdle” (Bnff.9 1927). [′brɑŋki]  
  80. Anicht adv.ANICHT, adv. By night. Bnff.2 1931: He hiz a hire't nurse aside 'im a-nicht as weel's a-day. [A 
  81. Hooren n.¶HOOREN, n. A disgust (Ork. 1825 Jam.).  
  82. Howffie n.¶HOWFFIE, n. ? = howpie, Howp, a mouthful. Abd. 1928 N. Shepherd Quarry Wood xv.: Ye jist tak a howffie an' a kowkie an' ye're a' richt again.  
  83. Luiskyan n.LUISKYAN, n. A great quantity of food, a bellyful. Ork. 1929 Marw.: What a luiskyan he laid i' him. [Appar. a corrupt form of luirkyan, Lurgan, q.v.]  
  84. Baffer n.BAFFER, n. A struggle. Sh. 1866 Edm. Gl.: “To get a baffer” — to have a struggle against a storm 
  85. Gwintick n.¶GWINTICK, n. A pig (Mry.4 1932).  
  86. Gyrie n.GYRIE, n. “A stratagem, circumvention” (Slk. 1825 Jam.). [′dʒəiri] [Fig. use of Eng. gyre, a turning round, in dim., or giro, a tour, a circuit.]  
  87. Moind n.†MOIND, n. Also mond. A period of time (Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928)); a moment (Sh. a.1888 E.D.D.). [O.N. mund, a moment.]  
  88. Kirrabag n.†KIRRABAG, n. A “loosely applied epithet, e.g. a peerie kirrabag o' a boy'” (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [′kɪrəbɑg] [A variant of Garrybag, q.v.]  
  89. Kivilaivie n.†KIVILAIVIE, n. A numerous collection of people, a crowd, a mob (Lnk. 1825 Jam.). [Phs. a 
  90. Nisk n.¶NISK, n. A sudden jerk (Ork. 1934).  
  91. Geldin n.GELDIN, n. A girl “A good geldin is a tall girl” (Rs. 1916 T.S.D.C. II.). [′gɛldɪn] [Prob. a 
  92. Keep-miss n. comb.KEEP-MISS, n.comb. “A woman supported as a paramour” (Rxb. 1923 Watson W.-B.). [From keep = keept, pa.p. of Keep, + Eng. miss, a concubine, a kept mistress.]  
  93. Plaik n.¶PLAIK, n. A loose covering for the body, a Plaid (Ags. 1808 Jam.). [Phs. orig. a mistake, due to a 
  94. Pooit n.POOIT, n. A policeman. Ags. 1934 G. M. Martin Dundee Worthies 28: A policeman was given various names. Among others these names were: “a Peeler”, “a Bobbie”, “a Snout”, “a Poo-it”, or “a Slop”. [? A variant of powit, Powhead, a tadpole, from the policeman's helmet.]  
  95. Scoonie v.¶SCOONIE, v. To cheat, defraud (Cai. 1950). A scooniean bodie, a cheat, a “twister” (Id.). [Orig. uncertain, phs. a reduced form and vbl. usage of Scoonrel below.]  
  96. Bill-sweater n.BILL-SWEATER, n. A money lender. w.Sc. 1835 Laird of Logan I. 213: A canny Scotchman, a sort of a 
  97. Torrie interj.†TORRIE, int. Also torran. A call to a bull (Cai. 1905 E.D.D.). [Gael. toraidh, id., tarbhan, a young bull, deriv. of tor, tarbh, a bull. See Tor.]  
  98. Troyna n.†TROYNA, n. A name for a cow (Sh. 1932 J. Saxby Trad. Lore 195). See Drune. [Deriv. of Norw. dryn(ja), a, to low, of a cow.]  
  99. Trull n.¶TRULL, n. Deriv. trullion. A foolish person, a silly creature (Ayr. 1825 Jam.). [Appar. a local usage of Eng. trull, a strumpet, trollop.]  
  100. Tuckshon n.TUCKSHON, n. A knocking about, a rough handling, a rough and tumble (Ork. 1962). [Orig. doubtful. Phs. a humorous application of Eng. tocsin.]  
  101. Powler n.POWLER, n. Something which is outstanding of its type, a Beezer, Palmer. Cai.1 1945: A boy, looking at a big-sized haddock at the quay, says to a companion: “Boy, 'at's a great powler o' a chiel.” [Phs. a variant of pauler, something which astonishes one, a “knock-out”, a “floorer”, s.v. Pall, v., 2.]  
  102. Querd n.¶QUERD, n. A wooden tub, a fish barrel, a wooden chamber pot (Abd. 1808 Jam.). [A misreading for 
  103. Spig n.¶SPIG, n. A spigot (Sc. 1911 S.D.D.).  
  104. Staggle n.¶STAGGLE, n. A young stag, a male deer between his third and sixth years. Ags. 1958 C. Gibson Highl. Deer Stalker 107: A deer-calf becomes “a knobber” in his second year, “a staggle” in his third, “a stag” or “a hart” in his sixth. [Formally a dim. form in -le of stag, but prob. a corruption of Eng 
  105. Styuilk n.STYUILK, n. A silly fellow, a fool (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [stjølk] [Norw. dial. stulk, one who walks in a stiff, weak or stumping manner, a fellow, chap.]  
  106. Sunie n.¶SUNIE, n. “A term of reproach” (Sh. 1866 Edm. Gl.). [Cf. Faer. sýni, a miserable shabby person, O.N. sýn, a sight, vision, and Eng. “a sight.”]  
  107. Tanterlick n.†TANTERLICK, n. A severe stroke, a hard blow (Fif., Ags. 1808–25 Jam.). [Poss. a n. comb. From ? Tanter = lick, a thwack.]  
  108. Biler n.BILER, n. A sleeved waistcoat. See Beyler.  
  109. Skorper n.†SKORPER, n. A round bun, a cookie (Sh. 1808 Jam.). [Prob. an extended use of Norw. skorpa, a crust. Cf. Sw. skorpa, a biscuit.]  
  110. Snitter n.2SNITTER, n.2 A twitch for a horse (Ork. 1929 Marw.; Sh. 1971). Cf. Eng. dial. snittle, a noose, a 
  111. Yuchil n.¶YUCHIL, n. A muffler (Rnf. 1958).  
  112. Blianach n.BLIANACH, n. “A pithless man; not applied to a woman” (e.Rs.1 1929). [′blɪənəx] [Borrowed from Gael. blianach, meaning (1) a lean animal, (2) a slow inactive person.]  
  113. Drowie n.DROWIE, n. A slight breeze. Mry. 1914 Bnffsh. Field Club 25: A drowie or backie is a cat's paw of wind. [O.Sc. has drow, a squall, c.1600.]  
  114. Ever n.. 1908 Jak. (1928): A ever o' a man, o' a coo . . . etc.; a ever o' a fire, a great, blazing fire. Sh. 1914 Angus Gl.: A graat ever av a ku. [A form of Aiver, n.1, q.v., with extension of meaning.]  
  115. supplementary (2005) to Gollie v., n.GOLLIE, v., n. II. 1. Add to defin.: (gullie Bnff. 2000s). Add quot.: Abd. 1993: A gullie o a roar. A gullie o a laach.  
  116. supplementary (2005) to Nether n.NETHER, n. Add quot.: Cai. 1992 James Miller A Fine White Stoor 148: 'No sign o a fox?''I found a nether's skin,' pipes up a young Campbell.  
  117. supplementary (1976) to Bucharet n.BUCHARET, n. A mistake for Bleuchret, q.v.  
  118. supplementary (1976) to Ha-chaur interj.HA-CHAUR, int. A call to a dog to run at or hound a horse (Slk. a.1838 Jam. MSS. IX. 127). Cf. Hah 
  119. supplementary (1976) to Huil n.HUIL, n. Phonetics. Add: em.Sc. (a) hel.  
  120. supplementary (1976) to A' con-kind A' CON-KIND. Read: See Kin-Kind.  
  121. supplementary (1976) to Bauld adj.1BAULD, adj.1 Add: 4. Of a fire: burning fiercely, hot, also fig. of a burning thirst (Sc. a.1838 Jam. MSS. XI. 12, a bauld drouth).  
  122. Runk n.3RUNK, n.3 1. A descriptive term applied to anything especially large or bulky, a big clumsy animal or person, a large wave or heavy swell at sea (Sh. 1968). Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928): A runk o' a body, a runk o' a baess, a runk o' a sea. Ork. 1929 Marw.: A muckle runk o' a man. 2. A lump, esp. a lump on the head (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [For 2., cf. Faer. runkur, a knob or lump on a bone, Meaning 1. may be 
  123. Cursour n.†CURSOUR, n. A stallion. This meaning of courser has been obs. in Eng. since 16th cent. (N.E.D.). Cf. Cooser. Sc. 1862 A. Hislop Proverbs 5: A fey man and a cursour fears na the deil. Sc. 1896 A. Cheviot Proverbs 140: He nickers like a cursour at a caup o' corn. [O.Sc. has cursour, a large powerful riding horse or war-horse; a stallion, from c.1420, variant of coursour, a courser, a steed (D.O.S.T 
  124. Galimavis n.¶GALIMAVIS, n. A fool, a stupid person (Mry.1 1925). Cf. Gillieperous.  
  125. supplementary (2005) to Craigock n.CRAIGOCK, n. Add variant craigach Add to defin.: A wrasse; a perch. (craigach Arg. 1990s).  
  126. supplementary (2005) to Are-bone n. comb.ARE-BONE, n.comb. Supp.1 Add to defin.: prob. a lower rib rather than a vertebrae.  
  127. Deeal n.DEEAL, n. “A wet patch of ground, a little swampy piece in a field” (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [′diəl] Ib.: That's a weet deeal o' a piece that we kunno plough yet. [O.N. díli, a spot or mark; Norw. dile, a wet, damp spot, esp. in a field.]  
  128. Dillow n.†DILLOW, n. A noisy quarrel. Teviotd. 1825 Jam.2: What a great dillow thai twa mak.  
  129. Bumph n.BUMPH, n. Cf. Bumfle. [bʌmf] 1. A lump, a bundle. Dmf. 1925 W. A. Scott in Trans. Dmf. and Gall. Antiq. Soc. 19: Her claes were a' in a bumph aboot her. 2. A stupid fellow. Ib.; Kcb. 1937 (per Kcb.1): You're a muckle bumph. [Sc. variant of Eng. bump, a swelling. Cf. Humph for hump.]  
  130. Coolk n.COOLK, n. A reed (Arg.1 1937). [kulk] [Gael. cuilc, id.; Lat. culmus, a stalk.]  
  131. Cootle n.COOTLE, n. A splinter. [kytl] Ayr.4 1928: He's got a cootle in his foot.  
  132. Argey-reerie n.ARGEY-REERIE, n. (See quot .) Sc. 1911 S.D.D.: A wrangle, a scolding. [See Reerie.]  
  133. Booshty n.BOOSHTY, n. “A bed, a small bed” (Sc. 1911 S.D.D.). Cf. Buisty.  
  134. Brintlin n.1BRINTLIN, n.1 “A burnt moor” (Mry.1 1925). [′brɪntlɪn] [A reduced form of Bruntland, q.v.]  
  135. Chaudmallet n.†CHAUDMALLET, n. “A blow, a beating” (Abd. 1825 Jam.2). Corruption of Chaud Melle, below.  
  136. Tun n.TUN, n. Also †toun. As in Eng., a vat, tub. Sc. combs.: toun cog, a wooden vessel with a long handle used to pour the wort of ale into casks; †tumill [ < tunmill], a funnel used for the same purpose. Also in n.Eng. dial. Ags. 1712 A. Jervise Land of Lindsays (1853) 342: A tumill, a skimmer, a 
  137. Tuse interj.¶TUSE, int. A call to incite a bull (Bnff. 1866 Gregor D. Bnff. 201).  
  138. Bissing n.BISSING, n. “A partition between cattle in a byre” (Arg.11929). [Cf. Biss, n.]  
  139. Heiffle n.¶HEIFFLE, n. Amorous dalliance; “a toolyie with a young wench” (Fif. 1825 Jam.).  
  140. He-slip n.¶HE-SLIP, n. A lad, young boy (Sc. 1911 S.D.D.). [Cf. Eng. slip of a girl.]  
  141. Hist-hast n.†HIST-HAST, n. A confusion, muddle (Lnk. 1825 Jam.). [Appar. a reduplic. form derived from haste.]  
  142. Hobreck n.HOBRECK, n. A variant of Happrick, a straw basket, q.v. (Ork. 1902 E.D.D.).  
  143. Loogan n.†LOOGAN, n. A rogue (Lth. 1825 Jam.). [? Gael. lùgan, a deformed or sorry-looking fellow.]  
  144. Luig n.†LUIG, n. A hovel (Ags. 1825 Jam.). [Orig. obscure. ? Gael. log, a hole, hollow.]  
  145. Malapavis n.¶MALAPAVIS, n. A mischance, a misfortune (Upp. Lnk. 1825 Jam.). [Mal(e)-, badly + ?Pavie, trick 
  146. Mediment n.¶MEDIMENT, n. A middle course, a moderate way (Abd.6 1913). [Nonce formation from medi- + -ment.]  
  147. Mokie n.MOKIE, n. A stupid, silly lout (Cai. 1903 E.D.D.). [? Gael. mogach, a shaggy, uncouth fellow.]  
  148. Mollachon n.†MOLLACHON, n. A small cheese (Slg. 1808 Jam.). [Gael. mulachan, a cheese, Ir. mulchán.]  
  149. Kendlin n.KENDLIN, n. A young person. Erron. read as hindling and keulin (see Jam. s.v.). Abd. 1739 Caled. Mag. (1788) 501: A Chiel came wi' a feugh, Box'd him on's arse wi' a bauld brattle, Till a' the kendlins leugh At him that day. [O.Sc. has kenling, 1563, Mid.Eng. kyndlyng, a brood, a progeny, a young 
  150. Killie- prefixKILLIE-, pref. A prefix having intensive force, a variant of gillie-. See Gil-, and Cur-.  
  151. Klaams n.KLAAMS, n. A variant form of Clams, n.pl.1, q.v. (Fif. 1875 A. Burgess Poute 29).  
  152. Krappoch n.KRAPPOCH, n. A stoutly-built person (Cai.1 c.1920). [Gael. cnapach [′krɑ:pəx], a sturdy youngster.]  
  153. Kremes n. pl.KREMES, n.pl. A variant of Crame, q.v. (Lnl. 1868 A. Dawson Rambling Recoll. 45).  
  154. Lamgammerie n.LAMGAMMERIE, n. A variant form of Lagamachie, a rigmarole (ne.Sc. 1960). [Cf. Lamgabblich.]  
  155. Neukatyke n.†NEUKATYKE, n. A rough, shaggy shepherd's collie (Fif. 1825 Jam.); fig. a man who masters another easily in a quarrel (Ib.). Ib.: He shook him like a neukatyke, i.e., as easily as a powerful collie does a small dog. [Phs. a dog that lies in a corner of the room, in the chimney corner; from Neuk + Tyke.]  
  156. Nittin n.¶NITTIN, n. A Bicker, a wooden cup with two lugs (Rnf. 1837 Crawfurd MSS. XI. 319).  
  157. Glammast n.¶GLAMMAST, n. “A fright: ‘he catched a glammast'” (Mry.1 1925).  
  158. Goudie n.1†GOUDIE, n.1 “A blow, a stroke” (Ags. 1808 Jam.; Bnff.7 1927).  
  159. Jumphy n.¶JUMPHY, n. A lazy, corpulent person (Gsw. 1918 T.S.D.C.). [Phs. a palatalised form of Tumfie, q.v.]  
  160. Whaurie n.¶WHAURIE, n. “A term applied to a misgrown child” (Ags. 1825 Jam.). [Orig. obscure.]  
  161. Paysie n.PAYSIE, n. A peahen (ne.Sc. 1965). [A variant of pea- in peacock, peahen, + -Sie, dim. suff.]  
  162. Beauty spot n.BEAUTY SPOT, n. A thing of beauty. Abd. 1768 A. Ross Helenore 31: I grant, he says, she's nae a beauty spot But he that wad refuse her is a sot. [In St.Eng. beauty spot means a patch on a lady's face, extended also to mean a beautiful scene. The further extension to a person seems to be Sc.]  
  163. Bedigoon n.‡BEDIGOON, n. “A night dress, a garment worn in bed” (Arg.1 1929). [′bɛdɪgun]  
  164. Piskie n.2PISKIE, n.2 An excited movement, with a suggestion of ostentation (Cai. 1966), a flourish.  
  165. Pooscht n.†POOSCHT, n. A talkative little person, a chatterbox, gossip (Bnff.21935). [Variant form of Booscht 
  166. Sivvet n.¶SIVVET, n. A blow, smack, whack (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [Appar. a corruption of sufflet, Souflet.]  
  167. Billibue n.BILLIBUE, n. “A hullabaloo” (Sc. 1911 S.D.D.). [Prob. a reduced form of hullabaloo. See Billy-hoo.]  
  168. Truggs n.†TRUGGS, n. A nickname for a lazy workman (Cai. 1905 E.D.D.). [Orig. obscure.]  
  169. Tuardelie n.†TUARDELIE, n. Also turdilue. A drape surrounding the lower part of a bed, a valance. Ags. 1712 A. Jervise Land of Lindsays (1853) 340–1: A bed hung with gold coullered hanggins, a tuardelie, . . . a busting bed shewed with green, with a turdilue. [Fr. tour de lit, id.]  
  170. Bellicon n.BELLICON, n. “A blustering fellow” (Ayr. 1825 Jam.2). [Phs. a corruption of O.Sc. bellicos, warlike.]  
  171. Scant n.2SCANT, n.2 A type or size of slate (see quot.) (Abd., Per. 1969). Also in Yks. dial. Abd.27 1951: A short slate nailed immediately under the ridge of a roof; in pl. the highest row of slates on a roof. [A reduced form of Eng. dial. scantle, a small slate, conn. with scantling, a rule or standard of measurement, a dimension.]  
  172. Scathe n.¶SCATHE, n. “A sea-fish” (Bwk. 1942 Wettstein). [Appar. a mistake for seathe, Saith.]  
  173. Raitan n.RAITAN, n. A wood-boring beetle (Inv. 1958). Gael. [Gael. reudan, a timber-worm, wood-louse.]  
  174. Soog n.SOOG, n. A pout, a grimace of displeasure (Cai. 1971). [Orig. obscure.]  
  175. Spinkie n.SPINKIE, n. A dram, a glass of spirits (Fif. 1825 Jam.). [? Extension of Spink, adj., 2.]  
  176. Squoch n.SQUOCH, n. A gully, ravine (Cai. 1956). [Gael. sgoch, a notch, cut.]  
  177. Taltie n.¶TALTIE, n. “A wig, most probably a cant term” (Ags. 1808 Jam.). [Orig. obscure.]  
  178. Tanyel n.¶TANYEL, n. A tramp (Slk. 1930). [Orig. obscure ? a variant of Tangle, n. 1 2.]  
  179. Tareesin n.¶TAREESIN, n. A children's game, a form of tig (Per. 1950). [Orig. obscure.]  
  180. Teevock n.¶TEEVOCK, n. A notion, fancy, whim, in phr. to take a teevock (Rnf. 1931). [Orig. obscure.]  
  181. Smitchcock n.¶SMITCHCOCK, n. A grilled or broiled chicken (Abd. 1825 Jam.). [A corruption of Eng. spatchcock, id.]  
  182. Smoupsie n.¶SMOUPSIE, n. “A stripling, a youth, one not fully grown” (n.Sc. 1808 Jam.). [Orig. obscure.]  
  183. Dome n.DOME, n. A boy's marble (Ags.4 1916). [Extension of Eng. dome, a cupola.]  
  184. Drollan n.DROLLAN, n. A half-witted person (Cai.1 c.1920). [Gael. dreòlan, a silly, inactive person.]  
  185. Fap n., v.FAP, n., v. ne.Sc. form of Whap, a blow, a cuff, to cuff (Abd.27 1951).  
  186. supplementary (2005) to Fallachan n.FALLACHAN, n. Add quot.: Arg. 1993: A doot he's a fallachan somewhere.  
  187. supplementary (1976) to Brab n.BRAB, n. A broad-bladed trowel used by a mason (Per. 1950).  
  188. supplementary (1976) to Ali n.ALI, n. Add: Comb. alie selkie, a tame seal (Sh. a.1838 Jam. MSS. XII. 1).  
  189. supplementary (1976) to Chunker n.CHUNKER, n. A dirty mark on a window (Edb. 1958). [Orig. obscure.]  
  190. supplementary (1976) to Clien n.CLIEN, n. Etym. note. Read: [Dim. form ad. Ir. claidhe, a stone wall, a dry dyke.]  
  191. supplementary (1976) to Clod n.2CLOD, n.2 Add: Dim. form cloddie, a floury roll or bun, a Bap (Kcd. 1920).  
  192. supplementary (1976) to Dadie n.DADIE, n. A local name for a hawker (Rs. 1916 T.S.D.C.).  
  193. supplementary (1976) to Foeden n.FOEDEN, n. In taboo usage: a whale (Sh. 1814 Irvine MSS.). [Poss. a mistake. See Foodin.]  
  194. supplementary (1976) to Froister adj.¶FROISTER, adj. A misreading of swifter (Sc. a.1758 Ramsay Poems (S.T.S.) III. 292).  
  195. supplementary (1976) to Happin n.HAPPIN, n. A chance event, a happening (Sh. 1975). [Vbl.n. of Eng. hap, to happen.]  
  196. supplementary (1976) to Hottie n.2HOTTIE, n.2 A quicker turn of a skipping-rope (Per. 1920), from hot. Cf. Firies.  
  197. supplementary (1976) to Ingan n.INGAN, n. Add comb. ingan bag, a sportingslang expression for a football goal-net (Dmb. 1969).  
  198. supplementary (1976) to Keult n.KEULT, n. “A heavy burden, not normally a back burden” (Ork. 1973 Orcadian (26 July)).  
  199. supplementary (1976) to Klabbyclue n.¶KLABBYCLUE, n. A state of confusion (Ork. 1973 Orcadian (20 Dec.)). [A corruption of Kattaklu(r).]  
  200. supplementary (1976) to Laist n.2LAIST, n.2 A cobbler's last (Ags. 1892 A. Reid Howetoon 33).  
  201. supplementary (1976) to Miscalcull n.†MISCALCULL, n. A miscalculation. Sc. 1752 Burgh Rec. Slg. (1889) III. 369: By a miscalcull . . 7d.  
  202. supplementary (1976) to Moshie interj.MOSHIE, int. Also mockie and reduplic. forms, a call to a calf (‡em.Sc., Lnk. 1968).  
  203. supplementary (1976) to Skaigg n.SKAIGG, n. Etym. note. Add: But ? cf. O.Sc. skeg, a.1500, appar. a scoffer, satirical person.  
  204. supplementary (1976) to Bass n.2BASS, n.2 Etym. note. Read: [Gael. bas, a palm, hollow part of a club.]  
  205. supplementary (1976) to Beck v.2BECK, v.2 For “The call of a bird” read “To call, as a bird.”  
  206. supplementary (1976) to Beldie n.BELDIE, n. A stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus (Per. 1975). [′bɛldi] [A child's corruption of 
  207. supplementary (1976) to Blocher n.BLOCHER, n. A soft gurgling cough, a coughing of phlegm (‡Abd., Per. 1975). [See Blocher, v.]  
  208. Cloint n.CLOINT, Klont, n. 1. “A lump; piece of wood, esp.: (a) log of wood, a klont o' wood; a piece of wood, badly hewn; a klont o' a tree; (b) a shapeless stone, a klont o' a sten” (Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928)). 2. “A corpulent, clumsy person; an obese, dull person, a klont o' a fellow” (Ib.); also used of a clumsy animal (Sh. 1866 Edm. Gl., cloint). [Prob., as Jak. suggests, the same as Dan. klunt, a log of 
  209. Gaave n.GAAVE, n. A large village (Rxb. (Yetholm) c.1920; Rxb.5 1945). Gipsy. Gall. 1906 A. McCormick Tinkler-Gypsies, App. xxiii.: A chan gaave is a bad wee town. [Romany gav, a village.]  
  210. Flyfe n.¶FLYFE, n. A caper, a whim, a “flutter.” Gsw. 1877 A. G. Murdoch Laird's Lykewake 196: The auld preachin' bodie has tuk a daft flyfe, An' kiss'd in the by-gaun the cobbler's wife. [Prob. an alteration of 
  211. supplementary (2005) to Doddle n.DODDLE, n. Add variant doadle 2. Add quot.: Cai. 1992 James Miller A Fine White Stoor 162: And that's a stab, and that's a strainer, and that's a flag dyke, and that's a bull, and that's his doadles 
  212. Cudge n.CUDGE, n. “A small room or corner” (Cai. 1911 D.D. in John o' Groat Jnl. (17 Feb.)); “a part partitioned off a byre or barn, to act as a sty” (Cai.4 c.1920). [? Gael. cuid, a part, portion.]  
  213. Dag n.4DAG, n.4 “A nail to hang a coat on” (Kcb.10 1940). [The same word as Eng. dag, a pointed piece of metal, a pin or bolt (N.E.D.), from Fr. dague, a dagger.]  
  214. Deighle n.DEIGHLE, n. A squat, dumpy object. Ayr. 1890 J. Service Notandums v.: A pridefu' gaste o' a body, but a wee deighle o' a puddock hoved up wi' its ain concate. [Cf. Doychle.]  
  215. Bun n.3†BUN, n.3 “A large cask, placed in a cart, for the purpose of bringing water from a distance” (Ags. 1808 Jam.). [O.Sc. bun, bunn, bwnne, a small cask. Of obscure origin (D.O.S.T.). Cf., however, Boyne, Norw. bûna, a tub.]  
  216. Bursarship n.†BURSARSHIP, n. A scholarship. Sc. 1902 A. Lang Hist. of Scotland II. xxi.: The Scots name is “bursarship,” not scholarship, and a bursar is not a bursar in the Oxford sense, but a Scholar. [O.Sc. has 
  217. Correspondent n.†CORRESPONDENT, n. Ecclesiastical term: a committee of delegates from scattered church meetings (J.B.J.). Sc. 1738 D. Woodside Soul of a Church (1918) ii.: A day should be set apart . . . to lay a foundation for a correspondent.  
  218. Ait n.3†AIT, n.3 (See quot.) Mearns 1825 Jam.2: Ait, a custom, a habit; especially used of a bad one. [Cf. Norw. dial. ætt, a mark or trace of a thing (Aasen). See also Falk and Torp. See Ett.]  
  219. Breezo n.BREEZO, n. “A fire among the heather, a blaze on the hills” (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [′bri:zo] [Norw. brisa, a fire, flame, great blaze, brising, a big blaze, a bonfire (Torp).]  
  220. Chilto n.CHILTO, n. “A term applied to a girl” (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [′tʃltʊ] Ib.: That's a cutty chilto o' a lass. [Marw. compares it with Norse tulta, a little girl (*tjulta): cf. also O.N. stúlka, girl, lass 
  221. Huif n.2¶HUIF, n.2 A short-handled gaff used to land or hoist large fish into a boat (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [høf] [Norw. dial. hov, a pot-hook, a Cruik, orig. a hoof.]  
  222. Lolaby n.¶LOLABY, n. A spoiled child, a mollycoddle. Edb. 1843 J. Ballantine Gaberlunzie 8: A lumbering lout o' a blubbering boy … the lolaby screams at the tap o' his voice. [From Eng. dial. loll, a spoilt 
  223. Bag-a-rintle n.BAG-A-RINTLE, n. Sacking, coarse open-cloth. Sh.(D) 1928 T. M. M. Shewan in Sh. Almanac 188: Hit's as open as bag-a-rintle. [In the comb. a stands for of. See Rintel, a rag, a tatter.]  
  224. Mealie n.2MEALIE, n.2 A mob, a riotous assembly. Chiefly in Heriot's Hospital slang (Edb. 1859 F. W. Bedford Hist. Heriot's Hospital 343, 1898 J. Baillie Walter Crighton 285). [A nonce form of mellay, mêlée, a confusion, a rabble.]  
  225. Misdimable adj.MISDIMABLE, adj. ? Phs. an illiterate corruption of estimable. Sc. a.1825 H. Blyd's Contract (Jam.) 5: It was a gay bit misdimable house wi' a but and a ben an' a fireside.  
  226. Nappa n.NAPPA, n. A name for a seal (Ork. 1929 Marw.), phs. a sea-taboo usage. [Prob. a deriv. of Knap, n.1, a bump, rounded knob, from the appearance of the seal's head.]  
  227. Kinsh n.2KINSH, n.2 A small quantity, a “pinch” (Abd., m.Lth. 1960). Abd.15 1928: Cud ye spare me a wee kinsh of tibacca? [Phs. a parallel form to Eng. pinch, a small quantity.]  
  228. Kjöl n.KJÖL, n. A cooling breeze (Sh. 1960); fig. of friendship: a coolness, a breach (Sh. 1902 E.D.D.). Sh. 1899 Shetland News (23 Sept.): I heard at dey wir a kjöl atweet dem. [A n. usage of Cuil, to cool.]  
  229. Kneeve n.‡KNEEVE, n. A big, strong person; “a cove, a fellow” (Bch. 1919 T.S.D.C.). [kni:v] Abd.15 1928: He's a big kneeve o' a chiel. [? Back formation from Kneevle, phs. conflated with Knave.]  
  230. Lamgabblich n.LAMGABBLICH, n. A long rambling discourse, a rigmarole (Bnff., Abd. 1960). Bnff. 1954 Banffshire Jnl. (19 Jan.): Aff she gaed intill a lamgabblich o' a story. [A perversion of Lagamachie, influenced 
  231. Oshen n.OSHEN, n. A mean person (Gall. 1824 MacTaggart Gallov. Encycl. 368), a small, insignificant person. Ayr. a.1838 Jam. MSS. X. 229: A wee oshin. [Phs. an extended use of a notion, with wrong division of 
  232. Glackach n.†GLACKACH, n. A swelling, a boil. Gael. Arg. 1882 Argyllsh. Herald (3 June): It hov't an swall't the bouk o' a wincarnal an' didna it turn oot a sair glackach. [Gael. glacach, a swelling in the 
  233. Glaup n.GLAUP, n. “A small quantity served up for part of a meal. ‘A glaup o' parritch'” (Ayr. 1916 T.S.D.C. II.; m.Lth.1 1954). [glp] [A variant form of Glaip, a mouthful.]  
  234. Jurr n.1†JURR, n.1 A contemptuous term for a servant-maid, a “skivvy.” Ayr. 1786 Burns A. Armour's Prayer form of journeywoman, a daily help.]  
  235. Wanton n.†WANTON, n. A horse's belly-band or girth; a rope used to tie a pack or a load on a horse's back 
  236. Pernick n.†PERNICK, n. “A person who is precise in dress, in religion, or trifles” (Rnf. a.1850 Crawfurd MSS. (N.L.S.) P. 27), a stickler for detail, a fuss-pot (Fif. 1965). [A back-formation from Pernicketie, q.v.]  
  237. Plooky n.¶PLOOKY, n. A slight stroke or blow. Ayr. 1822 Galt Steam-Boat xvi.: Now and then gie them a plooky on the cheek with a pip or a cherry stane. [Orig. uncertain. Phs. a conflation of pluck and Pook.]  
  238. Poldach n.¶POLDACH, n. A stretch of flat marshy ground by the side of a river, a Haugh (Ags. 1808 Jam.). [Phs. from a place-name of Gael. orig., now disappeared. ? Gael. pol, a pool, + dauch, Davach, q.v.]  
  239. Shirrarie n.SHIRRARIE, n. A squabble, row, fracas (ne.Sc. 1921 T.S.D.C.). [ʃɪ′rɑre] [Variant of Eng. and Ir. dial. siserary, a violent scolding, a severe blow, a corruption of Eng. law term certiorari, a writ for 
  240. Trinyo n.TRINYO, n. A narrow opening between houses, an alley (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [A deriv. of Norw. dial. trong, narrow, a narrow path. Marw. compares Norw. dial. trøngja, a narrow part in a river.]  
  241. Trip n.2TRIP, n.2 A pile of stones set up as a division on a beach (Ork. 1929 Marw., Cai. 1973). [Norw. trip, a break or obstruction to be crossed on a path. Cf. O.N. þrep, ledge, platform. See also Treb.]  
  242. Rodshal n.†RODSHAL, n. A fat, dumpy, unwieldy person or animal. Also adj. rodshally, stout, podgy. [′rɔdʒəl] Ork. 1929 Marw.: The whalp's just a peerie rodshal. A peerie rodshally ting o' a whalp. [Orig. obscure.? A variant of Rodger above.]  
  243. Queck n.QUECK, n. A pebble, a stone. Also in Eng. dial. in form quack. Rxb. 1923 Watson W.-B.: A big queck = a boulder. [Prob. orig. a children's synonym for duck(-stone). See Quaick.]  
  244. Beff n.2BEFF, n.2 A stupid person, often with the accompaniment of flabbiness, stoutness. Mry.2 1933: Thon's a big beff o' a butcher. Bnff. 1898 W.G. in E.D.D.: He's a stoopit beff o' a cheel.  
  245. Race n.4RACE, n.4 The shimmering appearance of rising air on a hot day, especially over the brow of a slope (Ork. 1929 Marw.). [Norw. ræs, a streaming of water, a strong steady stream of air along a fjord.]  
  246. Stough n.¶STOUGH, n.? The context suggests the meaning “a false report, a fib”. [? stux] Kcd. 1897 Bards Ags. (Reid) 155: We ken there [sic] a sough, though maybe a stough, That we in a sheuch flang royal Malcolm.  
  247. Suggan n.†SUGGAN, n. A coverlet for a horse's back used instead of a saddle; a bed cover (Gall. 1824 MacTaggart Gallov. Encycl. 441). Ib. 46: The saddle a goatskin, by way of “sugan” [From Anglo-Ir. dial., ad 
  248. Tander n.2¶TANDER, n.2 Nonce variant or corrupted form of Stander, n., 2., a candle-stick, q.v. Abd. c.1881 W. Watt Tinker's Rhyme: Wull ye no' buy a rander, a tander, A roaster, a toaster?  
  249. Bilget n.1BILGET, n.1 “A billet for a soldier's quarters” (Sc. 1911 S.D.D. Add.). [Prob. a corrupt form of billet. O.Sc. billiet, billȝett, (1) a communion card, (2) a billeting order, 17th cent. Fr. and mod.Eng 
  250. Skirvel n.SKIRVEL, n. A flock of cormorants, seen at sea near a fishing ground, a sign of a good fishing (Sh. (Fair Isle) 1966). [Appar. a deriv. of uncertain formation (with collective force) of Scarf.]  
  251. Skran n.SKRAN, n. A term of contempt for a very meagre or unsubstantial thing. Ork. 1929 Marw.: A poor skran o' a ting. [Norw. dial. skrane, a lean, bony figure, skran, lean, skinny.]  

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  1. Evin-craigit adj.Evin-craigit, a. See Craggit a.  
  2. supplementary to Hindmest adj.Hindmest, a. Also Heindmest.  
  3. supplementary to Intyre adj.Intyre, a. Cf. Inteir.  
  4. supplementary to Kenspekill adj.Kenspekill, a. Cf. Conspeckell.  
  5. supplementary to Lombard adj.Lombard, a. Also *Lambard.  
  6. supplementary to Harin Harin. Cf. Hairne a.  
  7. supplementary to Hely adj.Hely, a. Also Hiely.  
  8. Frosnit Frosnit: see Fronsit a.  
  9. Blachit Blachit = Blechit ppl. a.  
  10. Overslippand ppl. adj.Overslippand, ppl. a. = Ourslippand.  
  11. Truphane n.Truphane, n. [OF truf(f)ant. Cf. med. L. trufa trifle, trick and Truf(f n.] A deceiver. — A trumpour a trvcour A hangman a hasardour A tyrant a tormentour A truphane a tratlour; Colk. Sow i 78.  
  12. supplementary to Graip n.Graip, n. (b) Add: A surd, a grap, a fader bed, a cruk, a Chak, a chyar; 1457 Peebles B. Rec. 119.  
  13. Cobie clowtare n.Cobie clowtare, n. [Cf. prec.] A cobbler. — Betuix a talȝeour & a sowtar, A priklous and a coble [B. hobbell] clowtare; Dunb. xxvii. 5 (A).  
  14. supplementary to Includ(e v.Includ(e, v. Add: a. Irland Mir. fol. 178 a.  
  15. supplementary to Inept adj.Inept, a. Add: J. Stewart 3/8 (see Inlegibill a.).  
  16. supplementary to Inmast adj.Inmast, a. Also: inmaist. Add: Loutfut MS. 112 a.  
  17. supplementary to Kinglyk(e adj.Kinglyk(e, a. Add: a. Alex. (Taym.) 1881.  
  18. supplementary to Hichty adj.Hichty, a. Add: 1. a. Alex. (Taym.) 3537.  
  19. Magnanimit adj.Magnanimit, a. — Maitl. Q. xlvi. 86 (see Magnanime a.).  
  20. Ourladinit ppl. adj.(Ourladinit,) Ourladynnit, ppl. a. See Ladinit ppl. a. 1 c.  
  21. Overladinit ppl. adj.(Overladinit,) Overlaidnit, ppl. a. See Ladinit ppl. a. 1 c.  
  22. Carhanded adj.Carhanded, a. [Car a.] Left-handed. — Scaeva, carhanded; Duncan Appendix.  
  23. Coeternall adj.*Coeternall, a. [ME. (? 1398)] = Coetern a. (See prec.)  
  24. supplementary to Host n.1Host, n.1 Add: a. (a) A calf who had a great host; 1678 Buchan Cl. I. 111.  
  25. supplementary to Irritant adj.1Irritant, a.1 Also Heritant.  
  26. supplementary to Kid ppl. adj.Kid, ppl. a. Add: a. We have a kid thief to our webster here; Copie of a Baron's Court 31.  
  27. supplementary to Hattit adj.Hattit, a. Add: Cf. *Haitit.  
  28. supplementary to Hery adj.Hery, a. See also Heerie.  
  29. Japer n.Japer, n. [ME. (1362).] A trickster, conjurer. — A faynit nigramansour, A japer, a juglour; Colk 
  30. Misly adj.Misly, a. = Mes(e)lie.  
  31. A-handit adj.A-handit, a. [A, one; Hand n.] One-handed. — Ane a handit sworde; c 1578 Maxwell Mem. I. 311.  
  32. Derare Derare, comparative of Dere a.  
  33. Dichtit ppl. adj.Dichtit, ppl. a. = Dicht ppl. a. a. — Alevin bollis gude and clene dichtit quheit; 1554 Reg. Cupar A. II. 117.  
  34. Flyrie adj.Flyrie, a. (?) — [Scho is] A filland flag, a flyrie [Ch. flagartie] fuff; Lynd. Sat. 2137 (B).  
  35. Lafted ppl. adj.Lafted, ppl. a. [Cf. Loftit.] Having a loft. — (see Laft n. a.)  
  36. Plessant-faceit adj.(Plesand-,) Plessant-faceit, a. [Plesand ppl. a.] — Pitsc. I. 17/17 (see Faceit a.).  
  37. Bravelike adj.(Bravelike,) Brawelyk, a. [f. Brave a.] Noble-looking. — A sort of brawelyk dame; Fowler 108/107.  
  38. Chicknawd n.Chicknawd, n. [F. chiquenaude.] A fillip. — Talitrum, a spang, a chicknawd; Duncan Appendix.  
  39. Cœlestial adj.Cœlestial, a. [Also e.m.E.] = Celestial a. — Dalr. I. 110/4 (as frome a certane cœlestial 
  40. Gillie n.Gillie, n. [Gael. gille.] A lad, a youth. — Scho is a gillie. Scho is a colt-foill, not a fillie 
  41. Bald n.Bald, n. [App. for baud, bawd, ME. baude, bawde (14th c.).] A bawd. — A skeg, a scornar, a skald, A baldstrod and a bald; Colk. Sow i. 100. Skaldis, baldis; Ib. ii. 152.  
  42. Loutish adj.Loutish, a. [e.m.E. (a 1553), f. e.m.E. lout n. (a 1548) a lout, clown.] Loutish, clumsy. — [Louis XII] randring the kirks … ouer pouerfull … maid a gros and a loutish fault; Fowler II. 83/4.  
  43. Skeg n.Skeg, n. [Prob. related to OE sceocca a devil, demon, but cf. also ON skækja a prostitute.] ? A corrupt or debauched person. — A skeg, a scornar, a skald; Colk. Sow i 98.  
  44. Heire-tather n.*Heire-tather, n. [Heir(e n.1] A hair-tether, a tether made of hair. (Cf. Hairie a., Hairne a., Harin a.). — For a heire tather 00 08 0; 1678 Fawside Coal Compt 29.  
  45. A A (the letter): see A per se. Of ladyis chose as is of letteris A; Dunb. lxxxvi. 6.  
  46. Double-deillar n.Double-deillar, n. [e.m.E. (a 1564).] A double-dealer. — A double deillar with dissait indeud 
  47. Filland ppl. adj.Filland, ppl. a. [Fill v.] Becoming full. — [Scho is] a storme of stryfe, … a filland flag; Lynd 
  48. Laich-neccat adj.Laich-neccat, a. Of a dress: Low-necked. — A lang taillit gowne … laich neccat with burlettis; 1578 
  49. Hak-saw n.Hak-saw, n. [Hak v.] A hack-saw. — A scimitar cut lik a haksaw; Adamson Muses Thr. (1638) 4.  
  50. Hamblit adj.Hamblit, a. ? = later dial. hamilt, var. of hamild Hamehald a. — A hamblit blak gymmer; 1597 Edinb 
  51. Irressonable adj.Irressonable, a. [Resonable a.] = Irrationall a. — O hart of man … , Blynd as brutale best 
  52. Bakgard n.Bakgard, n. [Bak a.] A rear-guard. — Wall. ix. 1745 (to folow thaim, a bakgard for to be).  
  53. Houkit adj.Houkit, a. ? var. of Hukit a. hooked. — For … a houkit clout to the poull end; 1692 Foulis Acc. Bk 
  54. Geigget n.Geigget, n. [e.m.E. gigget, giggot (1526), F. gigot.] A gigot. — Sum ruggit a geigget from a spald 
  55. Inbening adj.Inbening, a. [Bening a.] Unbenign, unkind. — Cursed Cateline … , Successour of a wrongus fame, and 
  56. Bodyit adj.Bodyit, a. [f. the noun. So e.m.E. bodied (a 1547).] Bodied; in comb. blyth-bodyit (see Blith a.).  
  57. Onterminable adj.Onterminable, a. [e.m.E. unterminable (a 1677).] Boundless. — Such a task onterminable … As thy 
  58. Overlodinit ppl. adj.(Overlodinit,) Overloadned, ppl. a. [Lod(i)nit ppl. a.] Overloaded. = Ourladin ppl. a. — The boat 
  59. Sautouer n.Sautouer, Sawtry, n. [OF] A saltire or St. Andrew's Cross. — A chefe, a bend, a fes, a pole, a cheueron, a wnde, a geron, a croix and a sautouer [F. sautouer]; Loutfut MS (ed.) 12a. And giff ȝe will wit quhat is a sautouer [F. sautouer] luk in this buk the armes of Boudeuille; Ib. 12b. There bene in armes callit two pynyons. One is quhen the feild is a sawtry Saynt Andrewes crosse; Ib. MS 61b.  
  60. A-bed. *A-bed. [ME. a bedde, OE. on bedde.] In bed. — Dovne a bed I me strekyt; Doug. vii. Prol. 93.  
  61. Inreprevabil adj.*Inreprevabil, a. [Late ME. irreprevable (Prompt. Parv.).] Irreprovable, irreproachable. (Cf. *Irrefregabill a.). — Alexander de Halys doctor inrepreuabil; Abell 2 *a.  
  62. Dolp Dolp (a round cavity): see E-dolp.  
  63. Droichy adj.Droichy, a. [f. prec.] Dwarfish. — There was Zaccheus, a man of a low stature, that is, a little 
  64. Fariar Fariar, var. of feriar Ferryar. — Scho callit to hir cheir … A fond fule, a fariar, A cairtar, a 
  65. Favorit adj.Favorit, a. See Evill-, Ill-, Wele-favorit.  
  66. Favourit adj.Favourit, a. See Evill-, Ill-, Wele-favorit.  
  67. Feeding ppl. adj.Feeding, ppl. a. [f. feed Fede v.] Feeding storm, a moderate storm preceding a more violent one — This is a feeding storme; 1641 Baillie I. 352.  
  68. Flaikkit Flaikkit, ppl. a. of Flake v.  
  69. supplementary to Hobbeld ppl. adj.Hobbeld, ppl. a. See also *Howbald.  
  70. supplementary to Hommiltye jommeltye adj.Hommiltye jommeltye, a. Also: hummeltie jummeltie.  
  71. supplementary to Improfitabil(l adj.Improfitabil(l, a. See also Inproffitable.  
  72. supplementary to Incorrigibill adj.Incorrigibill, a. Add: Abell 571 b.  
  73. supplementary to Inpronunciabyll adj.Inpronunciabyll, a. Add: Lynd. Dreme 592.  
  74. supplementary to Hafles adj.Hafles, a. (Refer to: Hawles, not: Haveles.)  
  75. supplementary to Hasard adj., n.Hasard, a. and n. ? Cf. Hachart n.  
  76. Knifed (Knifed,) Knyfed: see Two-knifed a.  
  77. Glowmand ppl. adj.Glowmand, ppl. a. = Glowming ppl. a. — Quhat plesans is in festis delicate The quhilk ar gevin with a glowmand browe; Henr. Fab. 233 (A).  
  78. Hewit-strang adj.Hewit-strang, a. See Hevid n. b.  
  79. Fuff n.Fuff, n. [Cf. next.] A puff of wind. — [Scho is] a storme of stryfe, A fillaud flag, a flyrie fuff 
  80. Fully adj.Fully, a. [e.m.E. fully (1505), ME. fulli (a 1300).] Full. — Thou sulde … slepe a gude fully slepe a gude lang quhile; Hay II. 144/15.  
  81. Luvabill adj.Luvabill, a. [Cf. Lufabill a.] = Lovabill a. 2. — William Blak … accusit … as a forstaller … aganis 
  82. Scruffer n.Scruffer, n. [Scrufe v.] A person who deals superficially with (a matter). — Calleing him a betrayer of sowles, a scruffer of scriptures; 1658 Cupar Presb. 182.  
  83. Belude Belude, Beluffit: see Belovit ppl. a.  
  84. Numbersome adj.Numbersome, a. [e.m.E. (a 1617, 1628).] Numerous, consisting of a large number. — He had a great 
  85. Skrymmorie Skrymmorie. (? A fanciful name for a fairy, f. ON skrímsl a monster.) — Skrymmorie fery gaue me mony a clowre; Doug. Pal. Hon. 653.  
  86. Trachle n.Trachle, n. [Trachlit p.p.] A struggle. — There is hope of a second life, Birth's a doom, life's a 
  87. Bottikin *Bottikin (a boot). See Boting and Brotekin.  
  88. Chader n.*Chader, n. [? OF. chaudere: cf. Chalder.] ? A cauldron or pot. — A brof caudron, a pot, . . a 
  89. Crossit ppl. adj.Crossit, ppl. a. [Cros v.] Made like a cross. — Thare is to the knycht gevin a suerd with a crossit 
  90. Darar Darar, comparative of Dere a. and adv.  
  91. Clerges n.Clerges, n. [ME. (a 1225) and OF. clergesse.] A female scholar. — A woman, the quhilk was of Ingland borne, and a noble clerges was; Hay I. 22/33.  
  92. Clouter n. ppl. a.] A patcher, cobbler. A tornament … Betuix a talȝeour & a sowtar, A priklous and a coble clowtare [B. clowttar, M. cloutter]; Dunb. xxvii. 5 (A). Colonell Stuart was (as is constantlie reported) first a cloutter of old shoes; Calderwood IV. 448.  
  93. Fair-wordie adj.Fair-wordie, a. [Fair a.] Well-spoken. — Beneloquus, fairewordie, ‘qui bene loquitur’; Duncan App.  
  94. Dustling ppl. adj.Dustling, ppl. a. ? Drizzly. — A dustling gray day; 1659 Hay Diary 18.  
  95. Forky adj.Forky, a. (?) — A forky fure, ay furthwart, and forsy in draucht; Dunb. Tua Mar. W. 85.  
  96. Foughtin ppl. adj.Foughtin, ppl. a. [p.p. of Fecht v.] Fought. — A furious foughtin batell; Balfour Ann. I. 27.  
  97. Fourfute adj.(Fourfute,) Fourffit, a. = next. — Ane fourffit stooll, ane flet stooll; 1653 Edinb. Test. LXVI A 
  98. Four-square adj.Four-square, -squayr, a. [ME. four square, squar (a 1300).] Square. — 1513 (see next).  
  99. supplementary to Hunt v.Hunt, v. Add: a. (2) Everie ane was hounting for a fatt kirk leiving; Melvill 31.  
  100. supplementary to Ilka adj.2Ilka, a.2 Add: In that ilka steid; Burgh Laws c. 106 (A). Seven S. 68.  
  101. supplementary to Ilkie Ilkie. Add: Payand. .for ilky aker xxti d.; 1415 (a 1443) Cop. St. A. 214.  
  102. supplementary to Immensurabill adj.Immensurabill, a. Also: -able. Add: ? Clerk Bann. MS. 32 a/79.  
  103. supplementary to Invasour n.Invasour, n. Also: inwasure. Add: a. Edwart sicund inwasure; Abell 972 a.  
  104. supplementary to Inveterat adj.Inveterat, a. Add: a. By ane inueteratt possession; Rep. Parishes 16.  
  105. supplementary to Irisch(e adj.Irisch(e, a. Also: Yrage. Add: A. 1. Wall. vii. 842.  
  106. supplementary to Keir adj.Keir, a. Also: keyre. Add: Ane keyre nag; 1525 Wigtown B. Ct. 204 a.  
  107. supplementary to Luggit adj.Luggit, a. Add: Also of buttons: ? Having a tag. — 1592 Edinb. Test. XXV. 24 b.  
  108. supplementary to Heretik adj.Heretik, a. Also: herretic. Add: A man herretic; Nisbet Titus iii. 10.  
  109. Labial adj.Labial, -el, a. [e.m.E. (1594).] In phonetics: Labial, made with lip closure. — A labiel symbol can not serve a dental nor a guttural sound; nor a guttural symbol a dental nor a labiel sound; Hume Orthog. 18. A labial letter; Ib.  
  110. Lafting n.Lafting, n. [Cf. Lofting.] The timber-work forming a loft. — (see Laft n. a.).  
  111. Laste Laste, written for Leste a. (least). — Leg. S. v. 569 (see Alther a. (3)).  
  112. Attressonable adj.Attressonable, a. [Irreg. var. of Tresonable a.] Treacherous. — O strang tirrand, tratour 
  113. Jairdine n.Jairdine, n. ? Cf. Jurdane (a chamber-pot). — A jairdine of peuther; 1685 Soc. Ant. LVIII. 363.  
  114. Hery adj.Hery, a. [e.m.E. heary, heery, hery. Cf. Hary a.] Hairy. — Mucor, hery mowldnes; Duncan App. Etym.  
  115. Funler n.Funler, n. A foundling. — Hamilton, Margaret, a fwnler; 1700 Interments Greyfriars 287.  
  116. Gardareilie n.Gardareilie, n. (?) — A gardareilie and a whistle; Adamson Muses Thr. 5.  
  117. Inparticipat adj.Inparticipat, a. [Participat a.] Having participation. — Being celestiall, And with angellis 
  118. Libbar n.Libbar, -er, n. a. ? Cf. late ME. and north. e.m.E. lybbere (15th c.), libber gelder, sow-gelder. b. f. Lib v.1: cf. OE. lybbestre a witch. — a. Scho callit to hir cheir … A libbar and a lyar; Colk. Sow i. 59. b. [In Crook of Devon,] Ye confessed … that ye was a witch, a charmer, and a libber; 1662 
  119. Lob n.Lob, n. (?) — Better a March nob nor a Maij lob; Carmichael Prov. No. 380.  
  120. Manman n.Manman, n. A Manxman, = mansman, Mans a. — To Manmen and Irlandmen; 1513 Wigtownshire Chart. 141.  
  121. Polands Polands. (Possess. of Poland: Polish.) — A Polands pedler; a 1625 Sempill P. 5.  
  122. Nob n.Nob, n. (? ) — Better a March nob nor a Maij lob; Carmichael Prov. No. 380.  
  123. Bischoplie adj.Bischoplie, a. [e.m.E. bishoply, byshoplye, late ME. bysshoply.] Bishop-like. — In a bischoplie 
  124. Merlit adj.Merlit, a. ? = Marlit a. — Ane merlit bed, ane kyrtill; 1502 Dunferm. B. Rec. I. 123.  
  125. Misobliging adj.Misobliging, a. Disobliging. — For a misobliging word She'll durk her neighbour ov'r the boord 
  126. Molestuous adj.Molestuous, a. [e.m.E. mol(l)estuous (1611), after tempestuous, etc.] = Molestsome a., q.v.  
  127. Phair Phair. Var. of Fair a. 1 a (= handsome). — The phair Pheles; Myll Spect. 280/12.  
  128. Bancor n.*Bancor, n. [e.m.E. bankor (1591).] A banker. — Argentarius, a bancor or purse-maister; Duncan 
  129. Daplar n.*Daplar, n. ? var. of Dublare. — A daplar and a sassar; 1457 Peebles B. Rec. 119.  
  130. Disdanefull adj.(Disdain-,) Disdanefull, a. [e.m.E. disdainfull (a 1542).] Scornful. — Ane wnnaturall disdanefull 
  131. Cruk(e)footed adj.Cruk(e)footed, a. Having a crooked foot. — Luripes, cruk-footed; Duncan Appendix.  
  132. Hedie-strang adj.*Hedie-strang, a. (Cf. Hed(e)strang and Hedie.) — A hedie strang voman; Medical Recipes 89.  
  133. Hidden adj.*Hidden, a. — Yow are sure of the hidden dish, a free welcom; Fraser Polichron. 481.  
  134. Haikit Haikit, var. of Hawkit a. — A broun haikit ox; 1630 Aberd. Sheriff Ct. II. 318.  
  135. Haingen Haingen, var. of Hingand ppl. a. a (hanging). — 2 haingen shelfs; 1680 Moncreiffs 668.  
  136. Hynd Hynd, var. of Hende a. (Cf. kynde knycht, *Kind a. 5.)  
  137. Chaistfull adj.(Chaste-,) Chaistfull, a. = Chaste a. — Fowler 130/122 (hir chaistfull thoughts).  
  138. Christing n.Christing, n. [Var. of Christin a.] A Christian. — Ane nobill christing callit Planctus; Stewart 
  139. Knar n.Knar, n. [Appar. ME. and mod. Eng. knarre a knot in wood (1382), a rugged rock (a 1250).] A knot in a thread. — Like … an unorderlie thread runne all together in knotts and knars; 1584 Calderwood IV 
  140. Halflin n.Halflin, n. [f. Half a. and -lin(g, as in Ȝingling, etc.] A half-grown youth; a stripling. — Thomas Abel, a haflin; 1662 Greyfriars Interments i. John Adam, tailor, a halflin; 1685 Ib. 4. 1697 Ib. 5 
  141. Joco-serious adj.Joco-serious, a. [e.m.E. (a 1661).] Partly in jest and partly in earnest. — Ther was a litle money payed for a sight of this gladiatory joco-serious divertishment; 1685 Lauder Observes 145. A Joco 
  142. Lefull adj.3(Lefull,) Leiful, a.3 ? Law-abiding (Leful(l a.1 and cf. Lauchfull a. 6, Lawfull a. 5), or ? compassionate, kindly, sympathizing (mod. Sc. leeful, leefou). — The leiful man is a beggers broder; Carmichael 
  143. Sesam n.Sesam, n. (?) — Then with a daring boldnesse thou reviles That sacred name, and with base skurrill stiles (Though in a roguish, comick, jesting sort) Thou makes of it a sesam, a skuff, a sport; Mure 
  144. Switche n.Switche, n. [e.m.E. swits (Shakespeare), swytche (?c1600) a riding whip; Switch v.] A blow from a thin stick. — [Stirling confessed giving Sownhouse] a switche with a wand; 1662 Melrose Reg. Rec. II 31.  
  145. Brocht n.Brocht, n. [? Gael. brùchd, a bursting forth, a belch.] A retch. — Ben ower the barr he gave a brocht, And laid among them sic a lochet [sic], With eructavit cor meum; 1583 Sempill Sat. P. xlv. 143.  
  146. Narro adj.Narro, Naro, in a, ane nar(r)o, written for an, ane ar(r)o (Arrow n.). — Woundit with a narro; Abell 35 a. With a naro; Ib. 54 a. With ane naro; Ib. 54 b.  
  147. Nynckling vbl. n.(Nink-,) Nynckling, vbl. n. [Cf. late ME. nyngkiling (a 1400–50).] A slight intimation, a hint, inkling. = Inklin. — He had also hard a nynckling of a word, how that his majeste … had send [etc 
  148. Peplid ppl. adj.Peplid, ppl. a. [Cf. Peple v., Peoplit ppl. a. and Puplit p.p. and ppl. a.] Furnished with people, populated. — Ane toune weill peplid and busied; a 1600 A. Home in Bell. Livy II. 234/22.  
  149. Pietous adv.Pietous, ? adv. or ? a. [e.m.E. pyetous (Caxton), ME. pietous (Chaucer), OF. pietous, piteus. Cf. Petous a., Pitous a.] ? Piteously or ? Piteous. = Petuo(u)s a. 1 b. — Pietous; Howlat 256 (B) (see Petuo(u)s a. 1 b).  

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