Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

Hide Quotations Hide Etymology Cite this entry

ROWST, v.1, n.1 Also roust; ¶roost (Ags. 1894 J. B. Salmond My Man Sandy (1899) 107). [rʌust]

I. v. 1. To roar, shout, bellow (Sc. 1710 T. Ruddiman Gl. to Douglas Aeneis; n.Sc. 1808 Jam.; Ags. 1968). Hence rousting, vbl.n., roaring, shouting (Id.); ppl.adj., roaring, noisy, vociferous; of a fire: blazing, roaring (Fif. 1968); of weather: blustery, windy (Ags., Fif. 1968). Agent n. rowster, a tempest, blizzard (Abd. 1968). Sc. 1747  Lyon in Mourning (S.H.S.) II. 220:
Ground your arms and rowst no more.
Sc. 1793  “Tam Thrum” Look before ye Loup 35:
Come then, Charles, let's hae God save the King, an' I'll roust a bass to ye.
Sc. 1820  A. Sutherland St Kathleen III. iv.:
Wha's that rousting for Jim Niel?
Fif. 1827  W. Tennant Papistry Storm'd 119:
At's mou' he had a trumpet braw, Whairwi' he 'gan to roust and blaw.
Abd. 1832  W. Scott Poems 182:
The nout were roustin' like to feight.
Ags. 1879  J. Guthrie Poems 25:
The cattle roustin' at the style's nae richt.
Kcd. 1933  L. G. Gibbon Cloud Howe (1937) 26:
A rousting night in December's close.

2. Transf. to brag, boast, bluster (Abd. 1968).

II. n. A roar, bellow or loud penetrating noise, the act of roaring or bellowing (n.Sc. 1808 Jam.; Ags. 1968). Deriv. rousty, having a loud hoarse voice (Sc. 1710 T. Ruddiman Gl. to Douglas Aeneis, 1808 Jam.). Abd. 1804  W. Tarras Poems 93:
Horse-Jockies thro' the Shoo-gate rant, Wi' monie a roust an' rair.
Ags. 1815  G. Beattie Poems (1882) 182:
To ilk bellow, roust, and roar.
Abd. 1928 4 :
Heard in connection with a foghorn: “Sic a rowst”.

[O.Sc. rowste, a loud noise, a.1400, Mid.Eng. rowwst, voice, O.N. raust, id.]

You may wish to vary the format shown below depending on the citation style used.

"Rowst v.1, n.1". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 17 Nov 2019 <https://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/rowst_v1_n1>

20055

snd

Try an Advanced Search

Browse SND:

    Loading...

Share: