Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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MEASURE, v., n. Sc. forms (mainly ne. and I.Sc.): measer (Ork. 1880 Dennison Sketch-Bk. 33); messer; misser (Sh. 1898 Shetland News (27 Aug.)), missour, misure, mezzur (Rnf. 1876 D. Gilmour Paisley Weavers 46), mizzur(e), -o(u)r, -er, -ar; mizhur. [′mɪzər, ′mɪzh.ər]

I. v. 1. As in Eng. Sc. proverbial expressions. Abd. 1926 Banffshire Jnl. (23 March) 2:
We are inclined to “mizzer wir neeper wi' oor ain ell-wan'.”
Sh. 1951 Sh. Folk Book II. 63:
Mizzer twyse an cut wanse (Think before you speak).

2. To unload a herring boat's catch and determine its amount (Sh. 1962). Sh. 1937 Toilers of the Deep (July) 133:
Discharging or “measuring” takes some hours, especially with big “shots”, and we are usually covered with scales from head to foot.

II. n. The act of unloading a herring boat's catch and ascertaining the amount of fish caught; transf. a (small) catch of herring. Sh. 1898 Shetland News (13 Aug.):
Wid Donald Ertirson sleep soond if he saw ane takkin a skjöpfu' o' herrin', lat alane a hauf o' kishie oot afore da misser?
Sh.10 1962:
“Did you get ony da streen?” “Na, just a mizzer.”

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"Measure v., n.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 7 Jul 2020 <https://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/measure>

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