Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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BUFFLE, BUFLE, BUFFEL, v.

1. tr. “To push; shove; buffet” (Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928), buffel); “to beat; to beat with repeated blows” (Sh. 1914 Angus Gl.).

2. intr. “To walk with a clumsy, rolling gait; to work one's way through mud and snow, to geng buflin trough de snaw” (Sh. 1908 Jak. (1928)). Slk. 1835 Hogg Tales Wars of Montrose III. 17:
I was like to dee wi' laughin' when I saw the bodies rinnin' bufflin' through the heather in their philabegs.

[Frequentative form of Buff, v.2, q.v. Cf. Sw.dial. buffla, to strike, thump; Norw. bufsa, to walk clumsily, tumble about. See Torp s.v. buff, and cf. Beufsae.]

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"Buffle v.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 28 Nov 2021 <https://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/buffle_v>

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