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Showing results of a total of 61 results from The Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

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  1. supplementary (1976) to Forefreend n.FOREFREEND, n. An ancestor, forefather, a member of an older generation in one's family (Dmf. 1962 
  2. Duchas n. ancestors” (Nai. 1813 W. Leslie Agric. Nai. and Mry. 453, duchus). 2. “The possession of land by whatever right, whether by inheritance, by wadset, or by lease; if one's ancestors have lived in the same place. Shaw Hist. Moray 131: Kinchyle was fued to William MacBean, whose ancestors had the Duchus or 
  3. Lucrative adj. accepts part of an estate as a gift before the death of his ancestor, thereby involving himself in liability for the ancestor's prior debts (Sc. 1838 W. Bell Dict. Law Scot. 610, 1946 A. D. Gibb Legal Terms 
  4. supplementary (2005) to Pecht n., v. ancestors may have been established ... (Piggot 1962)'. I. 1. (11) Add variant pech-stane. Add quot.: Lnk 
  5. supplementary (1976) to Fore-elder n.FORE-ELDER, n. An ancestor. Lnk. 1832 C. Thomson Lesmahagow Martyrs (1928) 29: In the muirlands of 
  6. Aulders n. pl.†AULDERS, ALDERS, n.pl. 1. Ancestors, forefathers. South and West of Scotl. 1887 Jam.6: When; ancestors.]  
  7. Forebearer n.FOREBEARER, n. An ancestor, forefather (Fif. 1926 Wilson Cent. Scot. 242). Rare. Lnk. 1892 W. Ewing 
  8. Brag and pairs n. phr.. the same as brag, an old English game of cards, possibly the ancestor of poker. When a player held a 
  9. Forefolk n.FOREFOLK, n. Ancestors, forefathers (Cai., Abd., Ags., Slg., Clc., Ayr., Gall. 1953). Also in pl 
  10. E'enshanks n. nocket I maun hae, Ten to my e'enshanks. . . . Ib. 193: E'enshanks . . . was that food our ancestors took 
  11. supplementary (1976) to Kebbock n.: The Town's People of Inverness had now as terrible a Prospect as their Ancestors had, even on the 
  12. Passive adj.. viii. § 87: That apparent heirs might not, upon gratuitous dispositions from their ancestors, enjoy which an heir, if he accepts of a grant from his ancestor of any part, however small, of that estate to which he would have succeeded as heir, is subjected to the payment of all such debts due by the ancestor 
  13. Claver n.2 began to be supplanted by clover in the 17th cent. O.Sc. clever, rare Mid.Eng. clevre, is the ancestor 
  14. Pontius pilate's bodyguard n. given c.1635 during the Thirty Years' War by French troops to Hepburn's Regiment, the ancestor of the 
  15. supplementary (2005) to March n.1, v. Brown Time Gentlemen 86: Could an ancestor reach a handTo take mine, by the old march cairn, ... I. 2 
  16. Gairy n.1 about Halloween — afforded much amusement to our Scottish ancestors. Kcb. 1895 Crockett Moss-Hags xxxix 
  17. Cockit bonnet n. comb. cloth with two ribbons hanging loose behind, the ancestor of the modern Glengarry, which is also 
  18. Universal adj.-law, who in old law took as universal successor of his ancestor. Sc. 1933 Encycl. Laws Scot. XIV 105 
  19. Iorram n. ancestors. Arg. 1896 N. Munro Lost Pibroch 265: The twelve red-shirts swinging merry at the oars and 
  20. supplementary (2005) to Fife n. Fifer.Sc. 1996 Scotsman 15 Jun 17: That revolving sound you hear is my ancestors, who insisted that 
  21. supplementary (1976) to Dewar n. word has now become the surname of a family whose ancestors held this office. Hist. Hence dewarship 
  22. Forebear n.FOREBEAR, n. Also †forebeer, †-beir, †-bier, forbear, †-beer. An ancestor, progenitor, forefather 
  23. supplementary (2005) to Crannog n. Age/Early Iron Age ancestors of 2,500 years ago. Sc. 1999 Scotsman 30 Sep 21: Between the two 
  24. Mortancestry n. were originally distinct. By the brief of inquest one is served or declared heir to his ancestor; and 
  25. Murther v.1, n.1 up ”. Rxb. 1808 A. Scott Poems 31: Our ancestors were never . . . Murder'd wi' sic horrid ills As 
  26. Singular adj. his ancestor, and, as opposed to him, singular successor meant anyone taking a portion of the estate 
  27. Reeb n., v. Shetland boat of his time had more planks a side than her ancestors, there were several planks between the 
  28. supplementary (2005) to Sheep n.1 Great Common Ancestor of both aforementioned affairs still survives and is, of course, Jock Cameron's 
  29. supplementary (2005) to Handsel n., v. ancestors fired folk,They brunt the weerded anes as sacrifice,Handselled the dark wi flesh and smokeThat the 
  30. supplementary (2005) to Kill v., n.2 Aug 7: Bluidy Tam — a direct ancestor of veteran MP Tam Dalyell, — is venerated in Russia for his 
  31. Broose n. of these in O.Sc., viz. bruis(e), might be the ancestor of the mod. bruise [brø:z], braize [bre:z 
  32. Misken v. miskenning Sir Duncan, keeping my own secret, and departing quietly by suffocation, like your ancestors 
  33. Tanist n. Tanistry — a system which depended upon a descent from a common ancestor, but which selected the man come 
  34. Service n. as such with an ancestor in relation to specific subjects in which the ancestor died infeft, whereas 
  35. Retour n., v. extract of a decision sent to Chancery by a Jury or Inquest, declaring a successor heir to ms ancestor serving heirs to their ancestors; which form the basis of their written title to the heritage of the 
  36. Flittin(g) n. which he calls his own. Fif. 1894 J. W. M'Laren Tibbie and Tam 97: What wad his honoured ancestors hae 
  37. supplementary (2005) to Douce adj. douce Dutch faces of my ancestors; the Nordic seas that glimmer in a pair of Viking eyes; the suns of 
  38. Cloot n.3 ancestor of the forms in -t, i.e. of Eng. clot, cleat, clout, and has prob. also given the present word.]  
  39. Bittle n.1, v. ancestor of the beetle form is O.North. *bētel (W.S. bīetel, from bēatan, to beat). In the pl. W.S. bītlas 
  40. Killogie n. amusement with our ancestors. Sc. 1857 H. Miller Scenes and Leg. 467: We'll trim up the fire in the killogie 
  41. Kindly adj. said to have a kindlie to a farm, or possession, which his ancestors have held, and which he has 
  42. Entry n. rents of the feudal subject where the heir neglects to renew the investiture after his ancestor's death 
  43. Heir n., v. ancestor's estates, in cases where the debts were very heavy, and thus limited his liability for those debts 
  44. Lucken adj., n.1, v., which, for some inconceivable reason, our ancestors had jammed into the midst of the principal street of 
  45. Mairriage n. Principles ii v. 9: Marriage could not possibly fall, where the heir was married before the ancestor's death 
  46. Thrapple n.1, v.1' fights for breath. Per. 1801 Letters J. Ramsay (S.H.S.) 57: One of the chief's ancestors who said the 
  47. Swine n.. (6) Edb. 1825 R. Chambers Traditions I. 180: Under these projections [fore-stairs] our ancestors kept 
  48. Sodger n., v. of their ancestors, and were justly proud of the particular distinction of being classified as “Ceres 
  49. Kilt v.1, n.1. 1828 Scott Journal (1890) II. 127: Our ancestors brought the country to order by kilting thieves and 
  50. Pecht n., v. ancestors may have been established in Scotland as early as 500 B.C. (see The Prehistoric Peoples of 
  51. Seed n., v. plough and harrows At barley seed. 3. An ancestor, progenitor, forebear (Cai. 1969). Also in Ir. dial 
  52. Thack n., v.1) Abd. 1949 Buchan Observer (18 Oct.): Straw, or “thack wyse,” as our ancestors would have called such 
  53. Pyot n., adj. vulgar in our time, as also by our ancestors, has still been accounted an ominous bird. During sickness 
  54. Guidman n. such relation to some of his ancestors. Sc. 1827 Scott Tales Grandfather xxvii.: When James V 
  55. Gutter n., v..-B.); (b) a native of a particular town; one whose ancestors have also been born in the same town for 
  56. Wale n.1, adj., v.. 1931 H. McDiarmid First Hymn to Lenin 20: If I'd to wale for ancestors, I'd ha'e Auld Ringan Oliver and 
  57. Eik n.2, v.1 Balmerino title did not inherit the high qualities of their ancestors. The phrase “Balmerino's eik”, tells 
  58. supplementary (2005) to Clan n. (s.v.hieland) or Borders (s.v. border), bearing a common name (from a supposed joint ancestor) and united under 
  59. Rive v., n. farm they'd rive up the earth. Abd. 1950 Buchan Observer (24 Jan.): Our ancestors who “reeve in” broad 
  60. Scots adj., n. E. Grant Mem. Highl. Lady (1898) 21: When improving times permitted our ancestors to descend from 
  61. Water n., v. to the superstitious beliefs of our Alban and Gaelic ancestors — the Each-Uisge, or Water-Horse, the 

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Showing results of a total of 47 results from A Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue (up to 1700)

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  1. Bear-befor n.Bear-befor, n. [Cf. Forebear.] ‘An ancestor. — Ȝhit we suld think one our bears befor; Wall. i. 15.  
  2. Proavus n.Proavus, n. (L. prŏăvus a great grandfather; a forefather, ancestor). — Proauus als siclike wes to 
  3. For(e)moder n.For(e)moder, -modyr, n. [e.m.E. foremother (1582).] A female ancestor. — His wiffis formoder or 
  4. Gran(d)father n.Gran(d)father, n. [e.m.E. grand-, graundfather (1546).] An ancestor; a great-grandfather. — Greit 
  5. Perauthor n. ancestor or founder.) — Defending … the perauthor of faith and righteousnesse Noe; Balnaves in Knox III 
  6. Unnecessity n. vnnecessity of keeping this custome [sc. of being buried beside one's ancestors] the … impossibility of it 
  7. Ancester n.Ancester, n. Also: auncester. [Early ME. an-, auncestre, -sestre, OF. ancestre.] An ancestor 
  8. Antecestor n.Antecestor, n. Also: antecestre, ant-, auntcestor. [See prec. and Ancester n.] An ancestor or 
  9. Fore-eldaris n.Fore-eldaris, -elderis, n. Also: for-, foirelderis. [ME. foreildres (a 1300).] Ancestors. As thare 
  10. Aying n. Orkney: Property inherited from an ancestor; patrimony. Rex … dimisit … comitatum Orchaden[sem] … cum 
  11. Ligne(e n.. Lineal descent, succession, ancestry. b. One's ancestors, collectively. c. The stock or progeny of a particular ancestor; a family, tribe or race. a. That it sulde be ane of the hie lignie [F. lignee] of France 
  12. For(e)fader n. (1526).] A forefather, ancestor. (a) Betwix oure fore-fadir & his mak Matrimone cane he mak; Leg. S 
  13. Sparkle n. eminently in their noble ancestors; 1650 Wodrow Hist. I (1828) 68. If there be within us any sparkles of 
  14. Schenachy n. Highlands to keep and rehearse the genologies … of their ancestors at their jollities; Irvine Nomenclatura 
  15. Progenitour n.. prōgenitōr, -ōris ancestor, f. prōgignere to beget.] An ancestor or forefather; a progenitor. (a) The degreis 
  16. Antecessour n., … burgessis and friemen; 1631 Lanark B. Rec. 128. 2. A progenitor or forefather; an ancestor. Our 
  17. Authour n. all peace). Dalr. I. 202/8 (authoris of the weiris). 3. An ancestor. The markland of Poleskine 
  18. Lignage n.. lignage: cf. Linage. This form common only in Hay.] a. Lineal descent from an ancestor, succession 
  19. Lucrative adj..). Lucrative successor, an heir-apparent who has accepted as a free gift during his ancestor's lifetime any 
  20. Magnify v., His grete ancestor … Suld first extoll; Id. Orph. 2. In all the waurld thi haly and blist name he 
  21. Ofspring n.. xxxii. 338. 2. a. The fact of descending from some ancestor; ancestry, birth, descent, origin. b. The persons descended from a common ancestor; lineage, race, stock. c. fig. For he wes cummyn off the 
  22. Grandschir n.-father, ancestor. Adam, our grandschyre, Quhilk, throw his crime, incurrit Goddis yre; Lynd. Dreme 781.  
  23. Tuitio(u)n(e n.. Test. XXII 377b. [That Dougall's ancestors had been] native men and servandis [to Ronald's and had 
  24. Parent n. Peebles B. Rec. I. 419. (2) Throw inobedience Off our parentis; Lynd. Mon. 5066. b. ? An ancestor. Becaus 
  25. Mortancestry n. the raiser is heir to certain property formerly possessed by an ancestor and now wrongfully held by 
  26. Riffle v. through with a view to using material discovered. The most expert … rifling the labors of their ancestors 
  27. Linage n., lynage, OF. linage var. of lignage Lignage.] 1. Lineal descent from an ancestor, succession, inheritance ancestor. (a) That herytag That to man I hicht and his lynag; Leg. S. xxix. 254. Fra thine he and his. One's ancestors collectively. My linage and forebearis war ay lele; Dunb. Flyt. 402. The large wirschip 
  28. For(e)bear n.., Be v. Cf. Bear befor, and Icel. fyrirverari.] An ancestor. In very common use from c 1460. (a) His 
  29. Kinrent n., tribe, race or stock (also const. of a particular ancestor). Common in Douglas. — On our kynrent, deyr 
  30. Lochaber-ax(e n., a weapon much used by our remote ancestors before the invention of gunns; Irvine Nomenclatura 201 
  31. Revive v. in't were all the ancestors wise reviv'd [: leiv'd]; Garden Worthies 76. 4. To restore to fresh life 
  32. Predecesso(u)r n.. one who is also an ancestor of the subsequent incumbent. (a) Oto … wes predecessoure Of the gud. (S.R.S.) 66. 2. Passing into: An ancestor or forefather. (a) Gif he and his predecessoris hes bene in 
  33. Elder n..) eldran, ældran, (WS.) yldran. Also e.m.E. sing. elder.] l. pl. Forefathers, ancestors. (a) All his 
  34. Race n. common ancestor or as belonging to a common stock. c. A clan. b. What tombe could intumulate any entyre 
  35. Tartan(e n. Aberd. B. Rec. II 55. Vestis varia, tartan, the old native cloth of our ancestors; Irvine Nomenclatura 
  36. Posterité n., of a common ancestor. Also plur. (a) The pape … made new feftment, Till hym and hys posteryte [: be 
  37. Fader n. of hyr fadir of lau; 1549 Compl. 3/10. 2. a. An ancestor. Now to begyn … off Woden, That fadyr wes 
  38. Heritag(e n. or nation's native land, considered as inherited from their ancestors. The Scottis fowndyd off thare 
  39. Successo(u)r n. 153/2. 2. One who is the direct or collateral descendant of a particular ancestor; one who inherits 
  40. Kin n.. Clan-Makdvf. b. The race or stock descended from a particular ancestor. Also fig. A man, callit Ruben 
  41. Vici(o)us adj. applied exclusively to the heir’s unwarrantable intromission with the moveable estate of the ancestor 
  42. Native adj., n.; 1583 Ib. 592. 1612 Coll. Rebus Alban. 206. [That Dougall's ancestors had been] native men and 
  43. Kindly adj. the present occupier and his ancestors. Chiefly kindly tenant (also possessour etc.), kindly takisman 
  44. Secund adj. another), related at two and three removes respectively from a common ancestor. ‘The second Act, c. 15 
  45. Rekkin v. genealogical account, as by enumerating ancestors, working out degrees of relationship, tracing descent, etc 
  46. Kepe v.. 1537. [Your ancestors] hes kepit and deffendit the liberte of ther subiectis; Compl. 3/31. Na mair a 
  47. Ta(k v.1 412. 24. To inherit (a characteristic, etc.) (of an ancestor, etc.). Criste rase in to that flesch 

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