Scottish National Dictionary (1700–)

from 2005 supplement

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BEAR, n. A rough working man, esp. one associated with the oilrigs.Gsw. 1985  Michael Munro The Patter 10:
bear A name loosely applied to any noisy or belligerent young man, usually a heavy drinker, varying from the merely boisterous to the positively dangerous. A pub frequented by many of these is known as a bearpit: 'Ah wiz oot wi ma wee cousin an his mates; a right crowd a bears they were an aw.'
Sc. 1990  Daily Record 3 Mar :
A big pay rise has been thrown to the angry "bears" in the North Sea oil production platforms.
Sc. 1990  Daily Record 27 Jun :
Angry oil workers are urging a strike offshore to mark the second anniversary of the Piper Alpha disaster. Leaders of the North sea "bears" are meeting in Glasgow tomorrow to consider calls for a 24 hour stoppage.
Gsw. 21 Jun-4 Jul 1996  Big Issue 24:
Was it his playboy philandering that first attracted you? Mary: Right from day one Rab was a post-modern reconstructed new lad, or "bear" as we called them back then.
Sc. 12 Jun 1998 p  Herald :
The economics of buying a beer on the Champs Elysees can be daunting. The bears, of course, lug huge carry-outs of cheap supermarket beer wherever they go.

Add Comb.: bearpit, A rough pub.Gsw. 1985  Michael Munro The Patter 10:
bear A name loosely applied to any noisy or belligerent young man, usually a heavy drinker, varying from the merely boisterous to the positively dangerous. A pub frequented by many of these is known as a bearpit: 'Ah wiz oot wi ma wee cousin an his mates; a right crowd a bears they were an aw.'

2. (1) Add quots.: Ork. 1952  R. T. Johnston Stenwick Days (1984) 30:
"Me sooan scones is the best in the pairish," she said, "if I dae say id mesel, an' me bere bannocks is next tae Chessie Clouston's."
Ork. 1956  C. M. Costie in Neil R. MacCallum Lallans 51 (1998) 5:
" ... 'Can thoo see the buttons apae his cott? bit neebody's ever offered me as muckle as a bite o bere bannock. A body gets fairly tired o fish an dunters year in year oot!"
Ork. 1995  Orcadian 19 Oct 17:
Sometimes in the old days our old tatties ran out before the new ones were ready, and we ate meat with bere bannocks instead, but that was a poor substitute and white bread was worse!

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"Bear n.". Dictionary of the Scots Language. 2004. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. Accessed 14 Nov 2018 <http://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/sndns275>

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